April 20, 2014

Tribal Crafts Hosts Holiday Sale Over First Two Weekends of December

 Tribal Crafts President Stephanie Kenny holds a dream catcher and stands among the Lakota and Haitian crafts, artwork and jewelry that will be showcased for sale the first two weekends of December for the Tribal Crafts Annual Holiday Sale, in the Old Lyme Marketplace (90 Halls Rd.) next to Jessie's Restaurant.

Tribal Crafts President Stephanie Kenny holds a dream catcher and stands among the Lakota and Haitian crafts, artwork and jewelry that will be showcased for sale the first two weekends of December for the Tribal Crafts Annual Holiday Sale, in the Old Lyme Marketplace (90 Halls Rd.) next to Jessie’s Restaurant.

Old Lyme-based non-profit Tribal Crafts Inc., will hold its annual holiday sale during the weekends of Dec. 7 – 8, and Dec. 14 – 15 in donated storefront space at 90 Halls Road in the Old Lyme Marketplace (next to Jessie’s restaurant).

Special guest Roger Herron – Lakota artisan jeweler – will be on hand showcasing his beautiful silver pieces from 1 to 4 p.m., during the first weekend of the sale.

Silver jewelry by Lakota artisans Mitchel Zephier and Roger Herron.  Herron will be on hand the first weekend (Dec. 7-8) of the Tribal Crafts Annual Holiday Sale.

Silver jewelry by Lakota artisans Mitchel Zephier and Roger Herron. Herron will be on hand the first weekend (Dec. 7-8) of the Tribal Crafts Annual Holiday Sale.

For the past 27 years, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme (FCCOL) has fostered a mutually beneficial partnership with the Green Grass Community located on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota.  Through this partnership, Tribal Crafts was incorporated in an effort to expand and market the arts and crafts made by the Lakota people.  In recent years, the organization has also supported the work of Haitian artists through an education program managed by one of FCCOL’s ministers.

The Lakota people face immense challenges on the reservation.  According to 2010 census data, Ziebach County, which makes up the majority of the Cheyenne River Reservation, is America’s poorest county with unemployment estimates of above 75 percent.  While the income offered by Tribal Crafts to Cheyenne River’s artisans is small in relation to the great need, members of Tribal Crafts’ Board of Directors know that the work is important.

Examples of the beaded jewelry and other items that will be available at the Tribal Crafts Holiday Sale.

Examples of the beaded jewelry and other items that will be available at the Tribal Crafts Holiday Sale.

“Buying a pair of earrings or a necklace may seem small to you and I, but on the reservation that money could help someone fix their car, pay their heating bill or buy groceries for their family,” says Tribal Crafts president Stephanie Kenny.  Kenny has been visiting Cheyenne River since she was 10 years old.  She and her mother, Karin Kiem, traveled to the Cheyenne River Reservation in 2013, purchasing additional items and returning Tribal Crafts proceeds to the Lakota crafters and artists.

Items for sale include handmade quilts, silver and beaded jewelry, paintings, dream catchers, tribal drums, wood sculptures and more.  Tribal Crafts encourages you to stop in and make a difference in someone’s life with your purchase.

To learn more, visit www.tribalcrafts.org or ‘Like’ the organization on Facebook for up to date information on sales and events.

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