October 1, 2014

Simple, Real Food: The Flavors of Jamaica

I lived in Jamaica for a few months back in the early nineties having always had a fantasy about living Caribbean style.  I moved to Negril and opened a Jamaican restaurant at a yoga retreat in town.  It was a short-lived experiment due to Hurricane Gilbert, which wiped out the entire island and I returned to NYC to start over once again.

Lately the weather here has reminded me of the warm winters they have on the islands and memories of that delicious Jamaican food has had me cooking dishes such as jerk chicken, curried goat and coconut rice.  Great for entertaining, this satisfying spicy and soulful cuisine is perfect for outdoor living.

With several weeks left of wonderful weather hopefully, I hope you get to try some of these dishes.  In case you don’t have time for cooking, my favorite hole-in-the-wall spot for Jamaican food in the area is Patty Palace in Middletown.  It is a family-run business and has really good jerk chicken and curried goat.

Jerk Chicken

Serves 6

Ingredients

jerk-chicken
2 tsp. allspice
2 Tb. chopped thyme
1/2 tsp. cayenne
1 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1 ½ tsp. salt
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 one inch piece ginger, chopped
½ tsp. cinnamon
1/4 cup vegetable oil
Juice of 3 limes
2 scotch bonnet peppers, chopped
6 scallions, chopped
4 pounds chicken thighs


Procedure

1. Combine the marinade ingredients in a processor and blend to form a paste. Make a number of shallow slits on the chicken and rub all over. Marinate for at least two hours or overnight in the refrigerator.

3. Heat the oven to 450. Place the chicken on two baking sheets and roast for 30 to 35 minutes rotating the pan once.*

5. Increase the oven to broil and broil the chicken for 2 to 3 minutes until golden. Or light a grill and grill until browned and crispy. Serve on a large platter with steamed coconut rice.

  • If you grill the chicken – grill for 40 to 50 minutes over low heat covered, turning occasionally.
  • You also skewer the chicken and then grill as an appetizer

Jamaican Style Curried Goat

Serves 10

Ingredients

Marinade:

3 pounds goat meat, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, leg of lamb can be used instead
1/2 cup white vinegar
5 scallions, coarsely chopped
Juice of 2 limes
1 to 2 scotch bonnet peppers, seeded, minced
1 tsp. allspice
1 Tb. black pepper
4 Tb. Madras curry powder
1 Tb. kosher salt
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 Tb. Madras curry powder
3 large cloves garlic, minced

Procedure

1. Combine the meat, vinegar, scallions, lime juice, peppers, allspice, pepper, 4 Tb. curry, and salt in a large bowl and marinate at least two hours or overnight.

2. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven and sauté the remaining 2 Tb. curry for 10 seconds. Add the garlic and cook another 20 seconds. Add the goat meat mixture and mix well. Cover and cook over medium low heat until the meat is tender about 2 hours. Add a little water or chicken broth if the pan is drying out. Taste and adjust seasoning and serve over rice.

Coconut Rice

Serves 8

Ingredients

2 Tb. vegetable oil
1 Tb. minced ginger
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups long grain white rice
1 can unsweetened coconut milk
1/2 tsp. salt
Fresh pepper
4 scallions, minced
1/3 cup sweetened coconut, toasted in a dry skillet until golden
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Procedure

1. Heat the oil in a medium saucepan. Add the ginger and onions and cook over medium heat 4 minutes. Add rice and cook 2 minutes, stirring. Add the coconut milk, and water to equal 3 cups, salt and pepper. Increase the heat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook about 10 minutes. Allow rice to sit, covered for about 5 minutes.

2. Fluff rice and garnish with scallions, coconut and cilantro before serving.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Organic or Not, That is the Question

We all are aware of the issues about pesticide use, GMO’s and the whole idea of sustainable food production but with so much information, it’s overwhelming to figure out what is best for you and your family.

I for one, do organic produce, wild fish and organic poultry and here are the reasons why I think it is something to consider.

For one thing eating organic means you are ingesting fewer pesticides. A recent study out of the United Kingdom reported that organic produce boasted up to 40 percent higher levels of some nutrients (including vitamin C, zinc and iron) than its conventional counterparts. Additionally, a 2003 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that organically grown berries and corn contained 58 percent more polyphenols—antioxidants that help prevent cardiovascular disease—and up to 52 percent higher levels of vitamin C than those conventionally grown.

Recent research by that study’s lead author, Alyson Mitchell, Ph.D., an associate professor of food science and technology at the University of California, Davis, pinpoints a potential mechanism to explain why organic techniques may sometimes yield superior produce.

It’s a difference in soil fertility, says Mitchell: “With organic methods, the nitrogen present in composted soil is released slowly and therefore plants grow at a normal rate, with their nutrients in balance. Vegetables fertilized with conventional fertilizers grow very rapidly and allocate less energy to develop nutrients.” Buying conventional produce from local farmers also has benefits. Nutrient values in produce peak at prime ripeness, just after harvest. As a general rule, the less produce has to travel, the fresher and more nutrient-rich it remains.

We know that organic produce up to now at least is far more expensive and I hope there will come a time when there will be no other choice so the prices will come down but for now it may be unattainable for some to afford. If this is the case there is a list called the “dirty dozen”, these are fruits and vegetables that are heavily sprayed and most contaminated. If you can choose organic for these items you will be doing your health a favor;

Apples

Celery

Strawberries

Peaches

Spinach

Nectarines

Grapes

Sweet Bell Peppers

Potatoes

Blueberries

Lettuce

Kale

I also recommend eating wild fish especially salmon, which, in its farm-raised form, is high in contaminants, has double the saturated fat as wild and dyes added to make the flesh the orange color we are all used to. They are kept in tight quarters and fed soy to increase their weight and the nutritional value is far less. Wild salmon, although more expensive is worth the extra bucks, with more calcium, iron, potassium and half the calories.

Try these delicious recipes for your summer entertaining and remember to read labels and buy local.

Seared salmon with balsamic orange sauce

Seared salmon with balsamic orange sauce

Seared Salmon with Balsamic Orange Sauce

Serves 4

Ingredients

1/2 cup fresh orange juice

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

2 Tb. mirin

1 shallot, minced

1 Tb. orange zest

Salt and pepper, to taste

1 Tb. olive oil

4 wild salmon fillets, 5 oz. each, skin removed

1 Tb. chopped mint

1 Tb. chopped basil

1 Tb. chopped Italian parsley

Procedure

  1. Combine the juice, vinegar, mirin, shallot and zest in a small saucepan; bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook 5 minutes until reduced to about ½ a cup. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat a large skillet over med-hi heat and add the olive oil. Sear the salmon for 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Turn and sear another 5 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter. Add the herbs to the sauce and pour the sauce over the fish. Serve warm with rice or mashed potatoes.

Kale Quinoa Patties

Serves 5

Ingredients

2 ½ cups cooked organic quinoa, cooled

3 large eggs. beaten

½ cup grated parmesan

½ cup scallions, minced

2 Tb. olive oil, plus more for sauteeing

4 cups organic kale, veins removed, chopped

1 tsp. sea salt

½ onion, finely diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

¾ cup bread crumbs

Procedure

  1. Combine the quinoa, eggs, cheese, scallions and salt in a medium bowl.
  2. Heat the 2 Tb. of the olive oil in a large skillet and sauté the onions and garlic for about 3 minutes. Add the kale and cook until soft and bight green. Transfer the kale mixture to the bowl with the quinoa and add the salt and breadcrumbs.
  3. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the skillet and heat the pan. Form the patties and add to the oil. Sauté until browned on each side about 10 minutes. Drain on a paper towel and serve.
Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Eating Light, But Still Tasty

I have always been a fan of lighter food even at the height of my catering career in NYC when I would cook for hundreds, at the end of the day I love to eat clean, simple meals.  Simple doesn’t mean boring or dull mind you, but can be the best if you chose quality ingredients.

People often ask me where I shop since we are not exactly in the middle of it all here and I must admit I drive all over to find ingredients that I enjoy.  It is worth the effort and, if planned properly, you can make a twice a month trip either north or west and you have many options for food shopping.

I personally prefer to take 95 South and hit Orange and Milford due to the abundance of markets along the Post Road. From Trader Joes and Whole Foods to Lin Asian Market, the Post road from exits 39 to 41 has it all.  If you live closer to Haddam, taking a trip to Glastonbury or West Hartford will be perfect for everything from a fabulous Whole Foods to wonderful Asian markets.

I love ethnic markets and Groton has a couple of good ones:– New Asia Market and Raj Cash and Carry both are ideal for ingredients from the East.

Here are a couple of recipes utilizing more exotic ingredients- perfect for entertaining:

Crispy_Fried_Shrimp_croppedFried Shrimp with Vietnamese Dipping Sauce

Makes 25

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds large shrimp, peeled, de-veined, butter-flied

Flour with salt and pepper

3 large eggs, lightly beaten

2 cups Panko (Japanese bread crumbs) or unsweetened coconut

Vegetable oil

Sauce:

3/4 cup lime juice

3 Tb. fish sauce or soy sauce

2 garlic cloves, minced

3 Tb. sugar

1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes or 1 small Thai chili, minced

Procedure

  1. Dredge the shrimp in seasoned flour. Then dip in the egg and then the bread crumbs.
  2. Place the shrimp on a baking sheet.
  3. Heat up a saucepan and add enough oil to come up halfway. When the oil is hot fry the shrimp a few at a time until golden. Drain on paper towels.
  4. Combine the sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and simmer a few minutes.
  5. Serve the shrimp with the sauce.

 

Rice Noodles with Cilantro, Peanuts and Mint

Serves 6

Ingredients

¼ cup rice vinegar

1 Tb. sugar

1 Vidalia onion, cut into half moons

8 oz. rice noodles

Sauce:

¼ cup lime juice

2 teaspoons vegetable oil

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, minced

4 scallions, sliced thinly

1/3 cup cilantro, chopped

1/3 cup mint, chopped

3 Tb. fish sauce*

1 Tb. soy or tamari sauce

Stir Fry:

1 Tb. vegetable oil

2 Tablespoons, chopped dry roasted peanuts

1 large cucumber, peeled, halved, seeded, thinly sliced

Procedure

  1. Combine the vinegar and sugar in a medium bowl and add the onion, cover and marinate for 30 minutes drain, reserving 2 tablespoons of the liquid.
  2. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil and cook the noodles for 2 minutes. Drain. Rinse well and transfer to a bowl and cut into three sections with scissors. Add the reserved vinegar and toss well.
  1. Combine the lime juice, oil, red pepper flakes, garlic, scallions, cilantro, fish sauce, mint and soy sauce in a medium bowl and whisk.
  2. Heat a large wok over high heat and heat the canola oil add the noodles and stir fry 4 minutes. Add the sauce and coat well. Serve on a platter with the onions, peanuts and cucumber on top

* for a vegan dish use all tamari in place of the fish sauce.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Stews and Entrée Soups

Beef Bourguignon

Beef Bourguignon

Winter is now in full swing as we have witnessed the past few weeks.  With freezing cold temperatures, snowfall, ice and the like, it’s a great time to turn to warming foods such as stews and entrée soups.

Some of my favorite meals are slow cooked in my large Le Creuset Dutch oven or, if you have a crock pot, these recipes are perfect.

I find with a one-pot-meal, the day after it tastes even better.  Perfect for company as everything can be done ahead.

So bring on the warm tagines, stews and what I call “kitchen sink” soups.  Just about everyone loves this type of eating and it’s good for you at the same time.

Amanda’s Beef Bourguignon

Serves 8

Ingredients

Red Wine Sauce:

1 Tb. butter

1 onion, sliced

1 carrot, sliced

2 cups beef broth

1 bay leaf

1 sprig thyme

zest of one lemon

zest of one orange

1 Tb. tomato paste

salt and pepper, to taste

2 cups red wine, Burgundy or Cabernet

Beef:

4 Tb. unsalted butter or olive oil, divided

2 large diced onions

2 tsp. sugar

¼ cup chicken broth

12 mushrooms, stems trimmed, sliced

4 thick slices salt pork, diced finely or ½ pound diced bacon

2 ½ pounds beef tri-tip cut into 1 ¼ inch cubes

Chopped Italian parsley, garnish

Procedure

  1. In a large saucepan melt the butter over medium-high heat and sauté the onion and carrot until browned about 8 minutes. Add the beef broth, bay leaf, thyme, lemon and orange zests and bring to a simmer. Cook for an hour and then add the tomato paste, salt, pepper and wine. Simmer another 40 minutes. Strain through a sieve and set aside in the same saucepan.
  2. Meanwhile heat 1 Tb. of the butter in a large high-sided skillet and add the onions, sauté them until they are lightly browned about 12 minutes, adding the sugar for the last 5 minutes. Add the chicken broth and deglaze the pan, season with salt and pepper. Remove to a bowl. Add 2 Tb. of butter to the same skillet and sauté the mushrooms over medium-high heat until browned about 5 to 7 minutes, seasoning with salt and pepper.  Add the mushrooms to the bowl with the onions. Add the salt pork to the same skillet and sauté until crisp brown, remove to the bowl and drain off the fat from the pan. Set the cooked salt pork aside.
  3. Heat the remaining butter in the same high- sided skillet and sauté the beef in batches over medium high heat to sear, seasoning with salt and pepper as you go. Add the red wine sauce and let it just come to a boil. Lower the heat, cover and simmer until tender about 40 to 55 minutes. Add the vegetables and salt pork and bring to a simmer another 10 minutes..
  4. Serve garnished with chopped parsley.

Chicken Tagine

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

1 whole chicken cut into 10 pieces

Kosher salt

1 Tb. white wine vinegar

5 Tb. olive oil

1 bunch cilantro, chopped

1 tsp. cinnamon

½ tsp. saffron

Salt

1 onion, chopped

5 cloves garlic, minced

1 tsp. cumin

1 tsp. ground ginger

1 tsp. paprika

1 tsp. turmeric

2 Tb. olive oil for cooking

¼ cup mixed olives, pitted

2 preserved lemons, rinsed well, or 2 whole lemons, zest and juiced

4 oz. pitted prunes

Procedure

  1. Rub the chicken with the salt and then wash it with the vinegar. Allow to sit for 10 minutes. Rinse and dry the chicken and set aside in a medium bowl.
  2. Mix the oil, cilantro, cinnamon, saffron, salt, onions, garlic, cumin, ginger, paprika and turmeric in a medium bowl. Rub over the chicken and marinate for 30 minutes.
  3. Heat the oven to 350.
  4. Heat the tagine or large deep saucepan and add the olive oil. Add the chicken and sauté until chicken is lightly browned on each side. Add the olives, preserved lemons and prunes. Transfer to the oven and cook for 45 minutes.
  • 2 ½ pounds of leg of lamb, cubed can be used in place of the chicken

Vegetable Chicken Soba Soup

Serves 8

Ingredients

9 cups chicken or vegetable stock

2 cups shredded Chinese cabbage

1 red pepper, julienne

1/4 pound shitake mushrooms, sliced thinly

4 scallions, thinly sliced

3 inch piece fresh ginger, julienne

1 boneless, skinless, chicken breast, cut into thin strips

6 oz. soba noodles, cooked, drained

1 bunch watercress, tough stems removed ( Swiss chard, spinach or bok choy can be used instead of the watercress)

2 Tb. rice wine vinegar

1/3 cup soy sauce or Tamari

1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

3 Tb. cilantro leaves

Procedure

1. Bring the stock to a simmer in a soup pot over medium high heat. Add the cabbage, pepper, mushrooms, scallions and ginger and simmer 5 minutes.

2. Add the chicken and cook another 5 minutes. Stir in the rest of the ingredients and serve warm.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Comfort Food for Cold Days

With the winter now in full swing, it is time for pulling out the stew and soup recipes and serving warm comfort foods.  I love a big bowl of soup with a salad and some crusty bread for dinner on almost any night and find nothing easier to make.  Since most soups can be frozen, it’s another meal that can be made ahead. which is my kind of cooking.

When you are ready to take a break from all the rich holiday meals, try any of these recipes for a warming and delicious meal.

White Bean Tomato Soup with Vegetables

White Bean Tomato Soup with Vegetables

White Bean Tomato Soup with Vegetables

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

2 cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

3 cups vegetable or chicken broth

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

4 garlic cloves, minced

3 carrots, diced

2 celery stalks, diced

1 cup dry white wine

Salt, pepper to taste

28 oz. canned tomatoes with juices, chopped

3/4 pound green beans, trimmed, cut into 1/2 inch diagonal slices

1 medium zucchini, diced

Tuscan kale, chiffonade, garnish

Procedure:

1. Reserve 1 can of the beans for later. Puree the rest of the beans in a processor with 1 cup of the vegetable broth. Set aside.

2.  Meanwhile heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat and sauté the onion, garlic, carrots and celery until slightly browned about 8 minutes. Add the wine and de-glaze the pan over high heat, scraping up all the brown bits in the bottom of the pan. Add the salt and pepper, remaining cup of stock, tomatoes, green beans and zucchini and cover, simmer another 10 minutes. Add the pureed beans and bring to a simmer, cook until all the vegetables are softened, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the reserved whole beans and salt and pepper to taste.

4. Heat the soup before serving and garnish with the kale.

Chick Pea Soup with Sausage

Serves 8

Ingredients

4 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

3 stalks celery, diced

2 carrots, peeled, diced

1 medium onion, chopped

2 Tb. olive oil

1 Tb. rosemary, chopped

5 cups chicken stock

2 cans chick peas, rinsed and drained

Salt and pepper to taste

5 sausages of your choice, sliced into ½ inch rounds

1 bunch Swiss chard or Escarole, rinsed, trimmed, roughly chopped

Procedure

  1. Sauté the garlic, celery, carrots      and onion in 2 Tb. of the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat      until softened. Add the rosemary, stock, chick peas, salt and pepper and      bring to a simmer. Cook for about 20 minutes. Spoon some of the solids      into a food processor and puree. Add the puree back to the saucepan and      cover to keep warm.
  2. Heat the remaining oil in a medium      skillet and sauté the sausages until browned. Remove to a plate lined with      a paper towel to drain. Add the sausages to the saucepan along with the      greens and heat the soup covered over medium heat. When the greens are      wilted taste and adjust the seasoning, serve in large bowls.

Creamy French Lentil Soup

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

1 Tb. olive oil

2 carrots, finely chopped

3 ribs celery, finely chopped

2 shallots, minced

Salt and pepper, to taste

5 cups chicken stock

3 sprigs thyme

1 1/2 cups French lentils

2 Tb. chopped Italian parsley, garnish

Procedure

1. Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan. Add the carrots, celery and shallots and sauté 5 minutes, season with salt and pepper. Add the chicken stock, thyme and lentils. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook until lentils are tender about 25 minutes.

2. Puree the soup with an immersion blender or food processor and season to taste.

3. Serve garnished with the chopped parsley.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Tasty Thanksgiving Veggie Recipes

Roasted Brussels sprouts are a wonderful idea for Thanksgiving dinner.

Roasted Brussels sprouts are a wonderful idea for Thanksgiving dinner.

The holidays are just around the corner and I know many of us become overwhelmed and stressed by the amount of preparation it takes to put Thanksgiving dinner on the table.  No matter what holiday you celebrate or how many people you gather, there are some helpful tips on how to take the stress out of the meal.

First of all plan your menus ahead, the sooner the better.  Write lists of what you have to prepare, how you want to set the table, shopping lists and what days you can begin which part of the meal.  I always make the dessert weeks before and freeze it if possible or at least two days ahead and then heat it up when needed.  Since it is chilly at night you can store some items in the garage such as root vegetables, fruits, prepared pies (the day before) to free up space in your refrigerator.

Certain dishes such as stuffing, cranberry sauce, pureed vegetables, mashed potatoes can be prepared this weekend and stored in the freezer or two to three days ahead.

I recommend my version of Thanksgiving and Christmas, which is to assign each guest a dish and leave you with just the entrée.  This has worked for many years at our house and everyone enjoys being part of the meal.

This year we are a small group of six and chose to omit the turkey for a change and will be serving plenty of traditional side dishes and a vegetarian entrée.  We have enjoyed turkey for a million years and thought it would be nice for a change.  Why not try something new?

Here are my easy to make sides that can be prepared ahead, as well as a wonderful vegetarian entrée or delicious appetizer if you prefer.

Remember to have fun, it’s all about the people and being together and any effort you make no matter how small will be appreciated.

Scalloped Potatoes

Serves 12

Ingredients

6 oz. cheddar cheese, grated

½ cup grated parmesan

2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled

1 ½ tsp. salt

½ tsp. pepper

1 small onion, chopped

3 Tb. all purpose flour

2 Tb. unsalted butter

2 cups milk, low-fat or whole

Procedure

  1. Heat the oven to 400. Butter a 13x9x2 inch baking dish.
  2. Mix the cheeses and set aside. Cut the potatoes in half crosswise and place in a large saucepan of salted cold water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and then drain. Allow to cool. Slice the potatoes into ¼ inch slices.
  3. Arrange half of the potatoes in overlapping slices on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle with ½ the salt and pepper, half the chopped onion, the flour and half the cheeses. Dot with the butter. Arrange another layer of potatoes on top, the remaining onion, salt, pepper.
  4. Heat the milk in a small saucepan until just about to boil. Pour over the potatoes and cover with foil. Bake for 1¼ hours. Uncover and sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top. Bake another 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes before cutting.

This recipe can be made three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator covered with plastic wrap. Reheat in a 300 degree oven for 20 minutes before serving.

Roasted Brussel Sprouts

Serves 8

Ingredients

2 pints brussel sprouts, trimmed and halved*

2 leeks, sliced in thin rounds

3 cloves garlic, peeled and halved

1 tsp. cumin seeds

2 Tb. olive oil

4 sprigs thyme, chopped

Salt and pepper

½ pound bacon, cut into large dice (optional)

Procedure

  1. Heat the oven to 375. Combine the sprouts, leeks, garlic, cumin, thyme and olive oil to lightly coat. Season with salt and pepper on a large baking sheet. Toss well and roast until tender about 45 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile heat a large skillet over medium heat and cook the bacon until crisp. Drain on paper towels and add to the brussel sprouts before serving. Serve hot or room temperature.

*Asparagus, cauliflower or red and yellow peppers can be added or substituted

This recipe can be made three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator covered with plastic wrap. Reheat in a 300 degree oven for 20 minutes before serving.

Stuffed Acorn Squash with Parsley Walnut Pesto

Serves 8

Ingredients

Olive oil

2 acorn squash, halved, seeded and cut in half

2 cups Italian parsley, washed, stems removed

1/2 cup walnut pieces

3 cloves garlic, peeled

1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese

1/2 cup olive oil

Salt and pepper, to taste

Procedure

  1. Heat the oven to 375.
  2. Drizzle some olive oil on the cut sides of the acorn squash. Place cut side down on a baking sheet and bake for 40 minutes until tender. Allow to cool slightly.
  3. Combine the parsley, walnuts, garlic and parmesan in a food processor and blend until smooth, add the oil slowly with the machine running and season well with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Cut the squash into wedges and spoon some of the pesto into the squash shells. Bake for 10 minutes until the filling is hot. Serve warm.

This recipe can be made three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator covered with plastic wrap. Reheat in a 300 degree oven for 20 minutes before serving.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Amanda teaches weekly classes at White Gate Farm and Homeworks and is also available for private classes.  Her cookbook; Simple Real Food can be ordered at Amazon as well as through her website www.amandacooks.com 

For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Fall Cooking

Indian lamb curry with potatoes.

Indian lamb curry with potatoes.

Fall is definitely here and so I am getting out the sweaters and flannel sheets.  It’s also time for making stews, soups and comfort foods.

I turn to braising for my favorite meal and last night cooked a delicious Indian curried lamb stew.  Served with steamed basmati rice and roasted cauliflower, we were very satisfied at our house.

Braising is a very popular method of cooking less tender cuts of meat, root vegetables and dark meat chicken. The long, slow cooking process not only gives flavor but breaks down the connective tissue in the protein leaving you with a melt in your mouth, falling off the bone result.  Think Ossobuco or your Mom’s best pot roast and you have braising at its best.  The liquid most often has an acid in it such as wine, tomatoes, alcohol or citrus and sometimes it may include all of these.  The acid is there to help tenderize and adds to producing a delicious sauce at the same time.

Vegetables are the exception since they are relatively tender.  The braising liquid consists of good quality stock with flavorings added such as fresh herbs, butter, olive oil or whole spices.

My favorite saucepan to use for braising is a large Le Creuset Dutch oven with a tight fitting lid.  Any similar saucepan will do but the weight of a cast iron pan is ideal to hold in the heat over the time it takes to get the desired result.  Crock pots are the perfect braising item and it’s almost a no-brainer since you can set the temperature on low and leave it for hours.

Here are some wonderful recipes for your enjoyment to showcase the perfect food for this chilly weather.

Indian Lamb Curry with Potatoes

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

2 ½ pounds lean boneless lamb or beef cut into 1½ inch chunks*

4 Tb. vegetable oil

2 black cardamom pods

1 cassia leaf- bay leaf can be used

½ tsp. black cumin ( nigella)

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tb. minced ginger

1 Tb. ground coriander

1 tsp. Indian chili powder or cayenne

1 tsp. turmeric

8 oz. tomato puree

1 1/2 cups water

4 small potatoes, cut into large dice

2 tsp. salt

1 tsp. garam masala

4 Tb. chopped cilantro

Procedure

  1. Heat 1 Tb. of the oil in a large      skillet and sauté the meat until browned, transfer to a plate and set      aside.
  2. Heat the remaining 3 Tb. of oil      and add the cardamom, cassia, cumin and onion. Cook stirring occasionally      until the onion is browned about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger,      coriander, chili powder, turmeric, tomato puree, water, potato, salt and      meat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover and cook until the meat is      tender about 1 ½ hours.
  3. Stir in the garam masala and      cilantro and remove the pan from the heat. Let it rest for 15 minutes and      serve.

*If you prefer using chicken and are using boneless skinless chicken breasts brown in step one and then add in for step three with the garam masala. For dark meat cook the chicken for 20 minutes.

Braised Greek Chicken with Artichokes

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 large chicken thighs

Salt and pepper

½ cup flour

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

1 cup dry white wine

3 sprigs rosemary, chopped

2 tsp. thyme, chopped

1 tsp. oregano, crumbled

1 can artichoke hearts, packed in water, drained and halved

1 cup chicken broth

2 lemons, juiced

Procedure

  1. Heat the oven to 425. Rinse the      chicken and pat dry. Season the flour well with salt and pepper. Dredge      the chicken in the seasoned flour.
  2. Heat the oil in a large skillet      over medium heat. Add the chicken and cook turning once until browned      about 15 minutes. Add the wine and herbs and reduce the wine to about      half. Add the artichokes, chicken broth and lemon juice and lower the heat      to a simmer, cover the pan and cook until tender about 45 minutes.
  3. Uncover and cook until the sauce      is thickened about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and serve with      the pan juices poured over.

Italian Hunters Chicken

Serves 4

Ingredients

2 Tb. olive oil

1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces, rinsed, patted dry

1 medium onion, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup dry white wine

1, 28 oz. can plum tomatoes, chopped with their juices

1 bay leaf

2 tsp. rosemary, chopped

2 tsp. thyme, chopped

1/4 cup minced parsley

2 Tb. basil, snipped, garnish

Salt, pepper

Procedure

1. Heat the oil in a large high sided saute pan over med-hi heat. Saute the chicken on both sides seasoning with salt and pepper about 8 minutes, until golden brown. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside.

2. Add onions and garlic to the pan and saute 5 to 8 minutes, until translucent.

3. Add wine and de-glaze the pan. Add tomatoes, with their juices, bay leaf, rosemary, thyme and parsley. Reduce heat to low add chicken back to the pan, partially cover and simmer for 20 minutes, removing white meat after 12 minutes, until chicken is cooked through. Season the sauce with salt and pepper to taste.

4. Serve garnished with the basil over rice pilaf or plain cooked pasta.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Chef Amanda teaches cooking classes for all levels along the Shoreline both privately and at locations such as White Gate farm and the Weekend Kitchen. For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Simple, Real Food: Summer Delights

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Summer produce is here and with it come many requests for how to use up all this gorgeous fruit, vegetables and herbs.

Amanda Cushman is back with some mouth-watering recipes for our readers.

She notes that something she recommends in all her cooking classes is to make sauces, pestos and vegetable fritters, and try freezing them, commenting, “Then you can enjoy later in the year when you have a hankering for fresh basil, zucchini or mint.”

Here are some delicious recipes to utilize  the abundant produce of summer. They are, in order:

Feta Pesto
Simple Tomato Sauce
Papaya-Lime Salsa
Minted Zucchini Fritters with Lemon Yogurt Sauce

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Feta Pesto

Makes 1 cup

Ingredients

1 clove garlic, peeled

1 large bunch basil washed, dried, stems removed

8 oz. feta cheese

3 Tb. toasted pine nuts

Fresh pepper, to taste

Procedure

  1. Place the garlic in a processor and chop finely. Add the basil, feta, nuts and pepper and blend well. Add a small amount of water to produce a smooth sauce. Transfer to a container and freeze or serve at room temperature.

 

Simple Tomato Sauce

Makes 2 cups

Ingredients

2 Tb. olive oil

1 small onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, minced

Salt, pepper

1/3 cup torn basil leaves

10 to 15 ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

1/3 cup red wine (optional)

2 tsp. sugar or 2 small carrots, peeled, diced

Procedure

  1. Heat the oil in a medium saucepan and sauté the onion and garlic until softened about 5 to 6 minutes.
  2. Add salt, pepper, basil, tomatoes, wine and sugar or carrots and cook over low heat until thickened slightly about 45 minutes. Season to taste and puree if desired. Freeze in plastic containers or use on pasta, grilled fish, chicken or as a sauce for vegetables.

Papaya-Lime Salsa

Makes 2 cups

Ingredients

1 small ripe papaya, mango or half a pineapple

1/2 red pepper, finely diced

3 scallions, very thinly sliced

1/2 red onion, finely diced

1/2 English cucumber, seeded, diced

2 limes or lemons juiced

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes, optional

1 Tb. chopped cilantro

2 Tb. chopped mint

Salt, pepper, to taste

Procedure

1. Peel the papayas and remove seeds, finely dice. Combine the papaya and remaining ingredients in a medium bowl. Stir and taste for seasoning. Cover and chill until ready to serve.

 

zucchini_frittersMinted Zucchini Fritters with Lemon Yogurt Sauce

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 pound zucchini, coarsely grated

Salt

3 scallions, minced

1/2 cup grated parmesan

1/2 to ¾ cup plain breadcrumbs

3 Tb. chopped mint

½ cup chopped Italian parsley

1 egg, lightly beaten

Fresh pepper

Vegetable oil for cooking

Sauce:

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt

3 Tb. lemon juice

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tb. chopped mint

Salt, pepper

Procedure

1        Place the zucchini in a colander and toss with 2 tsp. of salt. Place over a plate and weigh down with a heavy can, drain for 1 hour or overnight in the refrigerator. Squeeze out all the excess water.

2        Add the zucchini to a medium bowl with the scallions, cheese, breadcrumbs, mint, parsley, egg and fresh pepper. Using slightly moistened hands, form the zucchini mixture into 12 balls. Flatten them to make a ¾ inch patty. Test one out in a small skillet for seasoning. Re-season with salt and pepper if needed.

3        Heat a 2 1/2 -inches of oil in a medium saucepan and fry the patties until golden on both sides about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towels to drain and sprinkle with salt.

4        Meanwhile, combine the yogurt, lemon, garlic, mint, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Stir and taste for seasoning. Serve the patties warm or room temperature with the yogurt sauce.

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A Great Time to Grill

Succulent shrimp are always a popular grilled dish.

Succulent shrimp are always a popular grilled dish.

Summer is here in full swing and what a great time of year to cook outside and enjoy healthy, easy meals prepared on the grill.

I have always been a fan of grilling no matter the season due to the ease of preparation, healthy low-fat method of cooking and of course, the delicious results.

I have a class on grilling coming up in July and it’s almost sold out, so clearly it’s a hit.

When I lived in NYC in a small apartment I cooked on a cast iron indoor grilling pan and enjoyed many a yummy dinner rain or shine.

Here in Connecticut I often use my indoor cast iron pan, not always wanting to light a large outdoor grill and sometimes needing to stay in.

Tips for grilling are; always marinate the food for at least an hour for flavor (overnight is ideal) heat the grill for about five minutes on high before cooking and then regulate the heat during the cooking time, brush with extra marinade while you are grilling and remember not to overcook your proteins!

Here are some terrific recipes for grilled meat, fish and vegetables all of which can be marinated in the morning or even the day before (except fish) and then slapped on a hot indoor or outdoor grill whenever you are ready.  A marinade can be boiled and used as a sauce (not for chicken) so don’t throw it away with all its fabulous flavor.

Grilled Thai Lime Chicken

Serves 4

Ingredients

Marinade

2 Tb. peeled ginger
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes
3 scallions, finely chopped
Zest of 1 lime
Juice of 3 limes
3 Tb. fish sauce
2 Tb. rice wine vinegar
3 Tb. honey
1/2 tsp. salt
8 chicken thighs, with skin and bone

Garnish:

1/4 cup cilantro leaves
1 lime cut into wedges

Procedure

  1. Combine the marinade ingredients in a large bowl and add the chicken.  Marinate 1 to 2 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.
  2.  Heat the oven to 400.  Line a baking sheet with foil.  Arrange the chicken skin side up on the baking sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. Heat a grill pan.
  4. Grill the chicken, turning and basting with the marinade until golden and brown about 10 minutes.
  5. Arrange on a platter and garnish with cilantro and lime wedges.

Grilled Shrimp with Heirloom Tomato Salad

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds large shrimp, peeled, de-veined
5 Tb. lime juice
1/3 cup olive oil
2 tsp. ground cumin
1 small jalapeno, seeded, minced
6 Tb. cilantro, chopped
1/4 tsp. salt
3 large Heirloom tomatoes mixed colors, diced
1 shallot, minced
1/4 cup basil, chopped
3 Tb. balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
6 cups mixed greens
1 half of a small papaya, peeled, diced

Procedure

  1. Combine the shrimp with the lime, olive oil, cumin, jalapeno, cilantro and salt in a medium bowl.  Toss and allow to sit at room temperature for one hour.
  2. Combine the tomatoes, shallot, basil, balsamic, olive oil, salt and pepper in a large bowl.  Allow to sit while you grill the shrimp.
  3. Heat a grill pan until hot.  Remove the shrimp from the marinade and grill until pink and curled, about 3 to 4 minutes on each side.  Transfer to a plate.
  4. Toss the mixed greens with the tomatoes.  Taste for seasoning.
  5. Place the greens on serving plates, divide the shrimp between the plates and top each serving with the diced papaya.

Grilled Portobello Mushrooms with Balsamic Glaze

Serves 4

Ingredients

1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
2 Tb. brown sugar
1/2 cup olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tb. fresh thyme, finely chopped
Salt and pepper
4 large portobello mushrooms, stems removed, wiped clean with a damp paper towel
2 Tb. olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 bag baby spinach

Procedure

1. Combine marinade ingredients and add mushrooms in a shallow baking pan.  Marinate 1 hour, or overnight.

2.  Prepare grill.  Grill mushrooms about 7 minutes turning and basting often.  Reserve any marinade that is leftover.

3. Meanwhile heat a large skillet over medium high heat.  Add the olive oil and garlic and sauté for 30 seconds.  Add the spinach and stir to wilt down.  Transfer to a serving dish.

4. Slice the mushrooms into 1/4 inch slices and arrange on top of the spinach.

5. Pour any reserved marinade over the top and serve.

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

Editor’s Note: Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., is a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She has taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for a variety of Fortune 500 companies including Yahoo, Nike and Google.  She began her food career in the eighties and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.  Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications. 

Chef Amanda teaches cooking classes for all levels along the Shoreline both privately and at locations such as White Gate farm and the Weekend Kitchen. For more information, click here to visit her website.

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Sourcing Out Unusual Ingredients

Amanda Cushman

Amanda Cushman

We are delighted to welcome a new columnist to LymeLine today.  She is Amanda Cushman of Simple Real Food Inc., a culinary educator who has cooked professionally for over 30 years.  She teaches privately for groups of two to 20 students in their home as well as having been taught in venues such as Sur La Table, ICE, The New School, Williams Sonoma and Let’s Get Cooking.

Chef Amanda has also taught corporate team building classes for over 15 years for companies such as; Fitness Magazine, Exxon Mobile, Hugo Boss, Yahoo, Nike, Google, Direct TV, Toyota and Korn Ferry International.

She began her food career in the eighties in the catering business in Manhattan and worked with Martha Stewart and Glorious Foods before becoming a recipe developer for Food and Wine magazine as well as Ladies Home Journal.

Having lived all over the United States including Boston, NYC, Miami and Los Angeles, she has recently returned to her home state of Connecticut where she continues to teach in private homes as well as write for local publications.

Chef Amanda teaches cooking classes for all levels along the Shoreline both privately and at locations such as White Gate farm and the Weekend Kitchen.

For more information, click here to visit her website.

Sourcing Out Unusual Ingredients

As a newcomer to the Old Lyme area and a chef, I have been very busy discovering all the farms, places to buy ethnic ingredients and sources for organic produce.  It’s a never ending process sourcing out the small Mom and Pop businesses that support the local economy as well as the more main stream purveyors that keep us supplied with wonderful fish, meats and produce.

Some of my discoveries are listed on my blog where I often report back with how to find specialty items, such as fish sauce or pad Thai noodles.  It seems that every day I discover a new source for hard to find items such as last week when one of my students told me about Ocean State Job Lot where she gets French lentils and a variety of organic, dry ingredients such as millet, quinoa, steel cut oats and gluten free flour.

Who knew that a large discount store such as this would have an entire line of items that I often spend double for in a health food store?

The fun of teaching cooking in an area such as Old Lyme is the treasure hunt for each class, which takes me to New London, Norwich, Middletown and Orange. I have  become familiar with the shoreline and surrounding towns faster than some people who have lived here for years.

Here are a couple recipes from recent classes that are sure to please and a reference for where to shop for each one.

Beef or Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

This recipe makes 30

Ingredients

1 flank steak, cut into thin strips against the grain or 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into chunks
1 package bamboo skewers
1/3 cup lime juice
1 Tablespoon minced ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno, minced
2 Tb. vegetable oil
3 Tb. soy sauce or Tamari*
4 Tb. fish sauce
3 Tb. brown sugar

Peanut Sauce

3 Tablespoons lime juice
1 Tablespoon peeled ginger
2 cloves garlic, peeled, halved
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or chili sauce
1/3 cup smooth natural peanut butter
1 Tb. soy sauce or Tamari
1 Tb. fish sauce
1/3 cup coconut milk

Procedure

1. Skewer the beef or if using chicken use two pieces per skewer. Place on two baking sheets. Combine the remaining ingredients in a small bowl and then pour over the beef. Marinate at least 2 hours.

2. Heat the oven to 400. Thirty minutes before cooking remove from the pans from the refrigerator.

3. Combine the ginger and garlic in a food processor and process until finely chopped. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth. Transfer to a small serving bowl.

4. Cook the skewers about 5 minutes to 7 minutes.

5. Serve the skewers on a platter with the dipping sauce in the center.

Alternatives: You can use shrimp, scallops, pork tenderloin or firm tofu in place of the chicken or beef.

*Tamari is a wheat free soy sauce for gluten free diets

Source: To find Tamari go to Foodworks, Fiddleheads or Whole Foods. Fish sauce is an important Thai ingredient and can be found at Panda Market in Norwich, Whole Foods or Lee’s Oriental Market in New London

 

Eggplant and Cauliflower Pakoras

Serves 8

Ingredients

1 ½ cups chick pea flour
2 Tb. peanut oil
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. garam masala
½ tsp. red pepper flakes
½ tsp. turmeric
¼ tsp. baking powder
3 green chilies, minced
1 ¼ cups warm water (110 degrees)
½ tsp. salt

Vegetables

3 Japanese eggplants, sliced thinly on the diagonal
½ head cauliflower or broccoli, separated into florets
Peanut oil for frying

Tamarind chutney

2 cups cilantro leaves
1 Tablespoon light brown sugar
1/2 cup tamarind paste
1 Tablespoon roughly chopped ginger
4 Tablespoons lime juice
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or more to taste
1/4 teaspoon salt

Procedure

1. Combine all the batter ingredients in a processor and blend until smooth. Transfer to a large bowl. Let the batter sit covered for about 30 minutes at room temperature. You can keep it for 2 days refrigerated.

2. Meanwhile blend the ingredients for the sauce in a food processor, taste and set aside.

3. Heat the oil in a wok or large saucepan until hot but not smoking. Dip the vegetables into the batter and then slip them into the hot oil. Fry until crispy and brown about 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Drain on paper towels and serve right away with the tamarind sauce.

Source: All Indian spices, tamarind and chick pea flour can be found at Raj Cash and Carry in Groton as well as Udupi Bhavan in Middletown

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