July 1, 2015

Independence Day Weekend Openings, Closings in Old Lyme

Old Lyme Town Hall offices will be closed on Friday, July 3.

The Old Lyme Transfer Station will be open on Friday, July 3, and closed on Saturday, July 4.

There is no change to the trash or recycling pick up schedule in the Town of Old Lyme on Friday, July 3.

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Acton Library Hosts Three Job Search Boot Camp Sessions; First on Interview Questions, June 29

CTWORKS Job Search Boot Camp will be held at Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook on three dates this summer as follows:

  • Monday, June 29: to discuss interview questions
  • Monday, July 27 :to discuss job search tools
  • Monday, Aug. 31: to discuss questions to ask employers during the interview

Boot Camp brings area people together who are unemployed or in career transition. These programs are free and presented by CTWORKS.

To register, call the Library 860-395-3184 or email TSells.ctwbs@ct.gov or for more information visit the library online at www.actonpubliclibrary.org.

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Registration Open for Fundraising Valley Shore Y Golf Tournament to be Held July 20

East-Lyme-AS-EnrichmentThe 24th annual Valley Shore Y Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 20, at the Clinton Country Club.

The 24th annual Valley Shore Y Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 20, at the Clinton Country Club.

The event helps raise funds for the YMCA’s Annual Campaign supporting the Y’s scholarships and community health initiatives, which truly impact families in our community. The goal of the tournament is to raise enough funds to ensure no one is turned away from any Y program for the inability to pay.

The foursome entry fee is $1,000 and individual fee is $250. Each entry includes:

  • 18 holes of golf, with a cart for four
  • Buffet lunch
  • Dinner
  • On Course Beverages
  • Prizes and Awards such as Hot Ball Raffle and Hole in One for a car
  • Individual and team prizes
  • Putting Contest

Golfers may find registration information at http://vsymca.org/golf-classic/. Sponsorship opportunities are still available.

For additional information, contact Tony Sharillo at tsharillo@vsymca.org or 860.399.9622 ext. 107.

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‘Summer Sculpture Showcase’ on View at Studio 80 in Old Lyme Through Sept. 13

The signature piece of Gil Boro's Summer Sculpture Showcase, "Queen Anne's Lace" by Gints Grinsberg.

The signature piece of Gil Boro’s Summer Sculpture Showcase, “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsberg.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and sculptor at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, is pleased to announce an exciting new exhibition on the grounds of his studio featuring examples of his own contemporary work accompanied by a selection of works created by a number of other widely acclaimed sculptors working in contrasting media. This Summer Sculpture Showcase will be on view from Monday, June 8, through Sunday, Sept. 13, and feature an Opening Reception on Friday, June 19, from 5 to 7 p.m. All are welcome to attend the reception at which light refreshments will be served.

Nine sculptors will be exhibiting in Boro’s expansive Sculpture Gardens located on the 4.5 acres of his residence on historic Lyme Street in the heart of Old Lyme, Conn. Their works will be interspersed amongst Boro’s own sculptures along with works by 13 other contributing artists on the beautifully landscaped grounds offering a unique plein air experience combining both large- and small-scale contemporary sculptures, many of which are for sale. The sculptors whose work – and in some cases, more than one piece – was selected for the Showcase are:

Diane Barcelo
Ashby Carlisle
Fay Chin
Gints Grinsberg
Lannie Hart
Deborah Hornbake
Elizabeth Knowles
David Millen
Elizabeth Miller McCue
William Thielen

The signature piece of the exhibition is “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsbergs. It is a large — 144” in height, 56” in diameter — yet delicate structure that evokes the intricate design of lace in its welded and stainless steel structure. Grinsbergs’ work has been featured at various museums and galleries and is Included in private and corporate collections throughout North America.

'Waves' by Fay Chin.

‘Waves’ by Fay Chin.

Fay Chin’s abstract aluminum sculpture in the exhibition titled, “Waves,” explores pyramidal relationships in a large, ground-based structure. A sculptor and painter, she has exhibited stone and metal sculptures nationally and internationally in museums, galleries, and public spaces with larger installations.

“Modern Dance,” a multi-colored sculpture utilizing wire fencing wrapped in vinyl surveying tape, is a collaborative work by Elizabeth Knowles and William Thielen. Natural patterns inspire the work of Knowles and Thielen, who live and work respectively in New York City and Carbondale, Ill. Both have an extensive body of individual work and have received numerous awards, grants and residencies.

'Pipehenge' by Gil Boro.

‘Pipehenge’ by Gil Boro.

Boro has enjoyed a distinguished career as a sculptor, architect, educator and international design consultant. He explores the interplay of space, place and scale in a wide range of media including stone, wood, metal and fiberglass. His vast body of work has been exhibited in numerous galleries throughout the US and internationally, and has also been purchased by collectors, corporations and foundations in both the US and Europe. Boro currently has several works being exhibited at off-site locations including the South Carolina-based Art League of Hiltonhead’s Biennale (where he was recently awarded second place in their 24th National Juried Exhibition), the New England Sculptor’s Association’s exhibition in Portsmouth, N.H., and Ramey Fine Art in Palm Desert, Calif.

This inaugural Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in a different location, while also effectively creating a new exhibition within the Sculpture Gardens. Boro comments, “I’m delighted to be able to open my grounds to these exceptional sculptors whose work intrigues me. Each one offers original creative thinking resulting in a fascinating combination of contrasting conceptual designs in a variety of media. I think any visitor to the exhibition is going to be thoroughly engaged by what he or she sees – including children.”

Boro is somewhat unusual as a professional sculptor in that he loves to see folk of all ages directly interacting with his sculptures, noting that he has a strong aversion to exhibitions, “… where people can’t touch my work.” Apart from attracting visitors to see the works on his grounds, Boro is thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and hopes this exhibition will help cement the town as a summer destination for art-loving visitors from near and far, especially during the town’s Midsummer Festival on Friday, July 24, and Saturday, July 25.

Located at 80-1 Lyme St., less than a minute from Exit 70 on I-95, the Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds are open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission is free. Children, field trips and group visits are all welcome. The Studio is open by appointment.

For further information, contact 860-434-5957, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com or email studio80sculpturegrounds@gmail.com

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Marine Art Exhibition, “American Waters,” on View at LAA Through July 31

"A Seaport Moment" by James Wagner is one of the signature paintings of the 'American Waters' exhibition.

“A Seaport Moment” by James Wagner is one of the signature paintings of the ‘American Waters’ exhibition.

Lyme Art Association (LAA) presents its summer exhibition, American Waters, in the LAA’s sky-lit galleries from June 12 through July 31. The exhibition will feature work by the country’s premier maritime artists, who are members of the American Society of Marine Artists as invited guests, alongside exciting marine work by LAA artists.

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held Friday, June 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the LAA, 90 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome and refreshments will be served.

'Marshall Point' by Kent Winchell.

‘Marshall Point’ by Kent Winchell.

Russ Kramer, an internationally recognized marine painter, will jury the exhibition.  Kramer comments, “What better place for an exhibition of marine-inspired art than the Lyme Art Association?” continuing, “It is a true landmark in our region’s artistic history, whose proximity to the Lieutenant and Connecticut rivers and Long Island Sound has inspired artists for a century. These new works in the exhibition American Waters are by many of the finest practitioners of marine art working today. To think the same subjects continue to inspire us 100 years later is testament to this area’s enduring, irresistible allure.”

'Afternoon Light' by the late Yves Parent.

‘Afternoon Light’ by the late Yves Parent.

Concurrent with the American Waters exhibition, the LAA presents a large exhibition of Yves Parent maritime paintings. Many of these paintings are of coastal landmarks, recognizable to boaters who have spent time in the waters around the New England coast. This will be the final opportunity to view and purchase paintings from the estate of Yves Parent at the LAA.

Lyme Art Association Board President, Katherine Simmons, states, “American Waters continues an LAA tradition of exhibiting the very best of fine contemporary American marine painting. We are grateful to the members of the American Society of Marine Artists who are joining us as invited guests, and we would especially like to thank our premier media sponsor, The Day, and our presenting sponsor, Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law, along with juror Russ Kramer, for making this exhibition happen.”

The LAA was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association’s home is a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within a national historic district.

Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call (860) 434-7802.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS 1st Boy’s Four in US National Final Today, Varsity Four Boats Sweep National School’s Championship

06/14 Update: The Lyme-Old Lyme High School Boy’s Varsity Four boat has qualified for the US Rowing National Youth Championship final today at Sarasota, Fla., at 1:01 p.m. The boat’s crew is Liam Corrigan (stroke), Josh Swanski, Jeremy “Remy” Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox). The race will be broadcast live on US Rowing’s YouTube channel.

GO LYME-OLD LYME!!

An extraordinary feat -- every Lyme-Old Lyme HS rower who went to the National regatta won a gold medal.

An extraordinary feat — every Lyme-Old Lyme HS rower who went to the National School’s Championship Regatta won a gold medal.

It was not only a perfect day on June 7 in terms of the weather when the crews of the Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) men’s and women’s 1st and 2nd varsity four boats competed in the National School’s Championship Regatta — but the result were perfect too.  In an extraordinary result for undoubtedly the smallest school competing — and a public one at that – all four boats won gold medals.

The crew of the girl's second boat celebrate their win.

The crew of the girl’s second boat celebrate their win.

The regatta, held in Fairfax County, Va., on the Occoquan River, is for school rowing programs that qualify from various regional and state competitions to race for a national scholastic title.  Clubs representing 13 states qualified and competed this year.

The boy's second boat in action.

The boy’s second boat in action.

Four LOLHS crews (20 athletes) qualified to represent Connecticut based on their State Championship at the Connecticut Public Schools Regatta in May.

The girls 2nd boat pose with their coach Steve Baranoski and their medals. From left to right, Lauren Dolishny,  Alexis Kolar, Caleigh O'Neil, Hannah Wilczewski and Francesca Melluzzo (cox).

The girls 2nd boat pose with their coach Steve Baranoski and their medals. From left to right, Lauren Dolishny, Alexis Kolar, Caleigh O’Neil, Hannah Wilczewski and Francesca Melluzzo (cox).

The girls 2nd boat, stroked by Hannah Wilczewski, defeated winning crews from Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Kentucky in the finals to take the gold with a time of 5:39.1 for the 1500m course.

The boys second boat stand with their coach Louis Zubek and their medals. From left to right, Peter Fuchs, Adam Drummond, Julia Morrison (cox) Brandon Green and Jacob Olson.

The boys second boat stand with their coach Louis Zubek and their medals. From left to right, Peter Fuchs, Adam Drummond, Julia Morrison (cox) Brandon Green and Jacob Olson.

The girl’s win was followed with the boy’s 2nd boat, stroked by Peter Fuchs, who were victors over crews from Massachusetts, Virginia, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania in the finals to take the gold with a time of 5:01.6.

The girl’s first boat (at rear in photo) taste victory at the winning line.

The crew of the girl's first boat proudly display their medals. From left to right, Steve Baranoski (coach), Christiana Congdon, Hannah Paynter, Claudia Mergy (cox), Allison Murphy and Maria Boyle.

The crew of the girl’s first boat proudly display their medals. From left to right, Steve Baranoski (coach), Christiana Congdon, Hannah Paynter, Claudia Mergy (cox), Allison Murphy and Maria Boyle.

After winning the qualifying heat in the morning, the girl’s 1st boat, stroked by Christiana Congdon, won with a time of 5:32.1 against crews from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Virginia.

The crew of the boy's first boat show their determination to reach the winning line first.

The crew of the boy’s first boat show their determination to reach the winning line first.

Similarly, after advancing through the qualifying heats in the morning, the boy’s 1st boat (borrowed from Glastonbury, as the Old Lyme boat was on a trailer to Florida), stroked by Liam Corrigan, completed the sweep by defeating crews from New Hampshire, New Jersey, Washington (D.C) and Massachusetts, with a winning time of 4:55.4.

The boy's first boat gather for team photo with coach Louis Zubek and their gold medals. From left to right standing are Josh Swanski, Liam Corrigan, Jeremy "Remy" Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox) in front row.

The boy’s first boat gather for team photo with coach Louis Zubek and their gold medals. From left to right standing are Josh Swanski, Liam Corrigan, Jeremy “Remy” Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox) in front row.

The boys 1st boat has now arrived in Florida to represent LOLHS this weekend at the US Rowing National Youth Championships — the premier sprint race for Under 19s in the country.

Go Wildcats!

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Lyme Farmers Market is Open for Summer Season, Saturdays

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

The perennially popular Lyme Farmers Market at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme opens again Saturday from around 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.

But the sad news this year is that the irrepressible, larger-than-life impresario of the market, Chip Dahlke, has announced this will be his last season with the market, “Unless…” and this is Chip’s endearing dry humor rising to the surface, “… a deranged individual or some goody two-shoes organization wants to take on the burden.”

In his ever upbeat, positive spirit, however, Chip urges, “Let’s make this summer one to remember.  The field should be full of vendors and the entertainment the best of what we’ve had for the last 12 years,” adding with his usual sharp wit, “There’s still not going to be eggplant carving contests, erotic vegetable displays, or god forbid poodle parades.”

tentsThe big draw of farmers’ markets is, of course, the fresh, local produce.  What makes the one in Lyme  so special is that it’s held on a real farm.  And since this is the Lyme countryside, it’s as a pretty as a picture.  In fact, Ashlawn Farm is a magnet for local artists who are attracted by its beauty—the old white homestead, the red barns, and the stone walls crisscrossing the pastures. An original member of the Connecticut Farmers Market Trail, Ashlawn Farm is located at 78 Bill Hill Rd. in Lyme.

The farm is celebrating its 126th anniversary this year.  Ray Harding, a dairy farmer, bought Ashlawn in 1909.  Today his grandson Chip lives there with his wife Carol and their three children.  By profession, Chip is a portfolio manager and Carol runs her popular coffee-roasting business in one of the old barns on the property.

As always, Dahlke has lined up a stellar selection of vendors, which includes:

TALK Seafood
Four Root FarmflowersThe vendors change week by week but you can be certain that every Saturday morning from June to October, tents will go up in front of barns and local purveyors will sell vegetables, fruit, breads, cheese, meat, soaps, chicken, fish, fiber, specialty food, crafts, flowers, herbs, eggs, seafood and more.  Music will be played — Dogbite are performing on Opening Day –and Chip will surely spring a few Saturday surprises!Before the Market opens, Ashlawn Farm Yoga will be held at 8 a.m. each Saturday on the grass beyond the parking field for all levels. The class is taught by Lisa Tompkins Nasser. Drop in for only $15, which includes a free Ashlawn Farm cup of Coffee.

Sign up for Chip’s entertaining weekly e-newsletter here

Like Lyme Farmers Market on Facebook hereAnd, most of all, follow Chip’s advice to make it a summer to remember at the Market — see you there!

Editor’s Note:
 Extracts of this article are taken from one written by Linda Ahnert that was originally published on LymeLine.com  in June 2009.
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Historic Waterfront Tours Scheduled in Deep River During Summer

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town's waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town’s waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River’s commercial connection to the rest of the world started at the end of Kirtland and River Streets in the early 1800’s. What is now known as the Town Landing, was a shipyard and dock, which collectively, were the linchpin to Deep River’s mercantile success. The shipbuilding provided the vessels and the dock provided the point of delivery of raw materials and the shipment of end products, that made Deep River an economic success.

A lecture and tour of Deep River’s Historic Waterfront will be offered every second and fourth Saturday morning, this June, July, August and September. Tours are sponsored by the Deep River Historical Society. The tour will start at the home of sea captain and ship builder, Calvin Williams, at 131 Kirtland Street, (immediately left of the Mt. Saint John entrance pillars), starting at 10 a.m. SHARP, each tour day. Each tour is expected to be about 1 1/2 hour duration and will start punctually at 10 a.m.

Reservations are recommended and tickets may be acquired at the door, or in advance, from the program’s director: James Hogan, by calling 860-391-2354, or at two convenient store locations: Celebrations, 161 Main Street, Deep River and Old Saybrook Antiques Center, 756 Middlesex Turnpike, Old Saybrook.

The costs for tickets is $20 per family; $10 adults; $5 students and senior citizens. 100% of all donations will benefit the Deep River Historical Society. All donations are tax deductable. Program is “rain or shine”.

For more information, call James J. Hogan III at: 860-391-2354

Tour Dates are:
June: 13 and 27
July: 11 and 25
August: 8 and 22
September: 12 and 26

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Film on LeWitt’s Landmark Synagogue set for World Premiere at Madison Cinema, Sunday

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CHESTER — Complete with a red carpet, the Madison Art Cinemas will host the June 14 world premiere of We Built This House, a one-hour film telling the story of Chester synagogue Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ)—known as a global art landmark for being the only public building that acclaimed artist Sol LeWitt ever designed.

Film producer-director Jon Joslow, a lifetime member of the Congregation, will discuss the movie and a reception will follow the screening. Tickets are open to the public and may be obtained for a donation of $18 each through the synagogue office, 860 526 8920. The start time is 11 a.m. Paparazzi are welcome.

In a 2013 profile, Town & Country‘s arts editor compared the striking Chester sanctuary with a masterpiece chapel Henri Matisse created in Nice, France. But the synagogue, opened in 2001, started as a napkin sketch. LeWitt first drew a structure inspired by traditional wooden temples of Eastern Europe combined with elements of colonial New England barns.

worshipWe Built This House traces how architect Stephen Lloyd translated LeWitt’s vision into post and beam, and how the Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek community collaborated and improvised—even adapting a design discovered in a medieval English watermill—to give structure to the sanctuary’s wooden dome. LeWitt’s iconic installation on the ark drew national attention when the building opened; it prompted Town & Country to observe “modern art as [the sanctuary’s] focal point.”

LeWitt, a Chester resident who died at 78 in 2007, is recognized as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century. The sanctuary has become known as one of the most astonishing, and spiritually welcoming, religious spaces in the world.

True to its roots, Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek has become one of the shoreline’s most vital cultural centers. Its Music & More performances draw hundreds and its art gallery features serial exhibitions from established and breakthrough artists.

Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek—Hebrew for “House of Peace Pursuing Justice”—is marking the 100th year since the founding of one of its two predecessor temples in Moodus. We Built This House is part of yearlong centennial celebrations culminating in an Oct. 3 gala and the inaugural presentation of the synagogue’s new annual Pursuer of Peace and Justice Award. Though it is located in Chester, temple members come from 36 towns, from West Hartford to Westbrook, Norwich to North Branford.

Producer/director Joslow is a crisis/transition leader for private equity who spent a year mining the history of the congregation and its building. Given time limitations in the documentary, which was conceived as a pilot, the synagogue is developing a parallel video archive to capture stories of all congregants who were part of the building’s creation. Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is also positioning the film to encourage financial contributions to support “Second Century” programming. Supporters can be listed in permanent screen credits as producers.

DVDs of We Built This House are expected to be released later this year. Given the film’s unique insights into art as architecture, and into how a community can join together in creative enterprise, organizers anticipate interest among public television stations, those engaged in architectural and design collaborations, and art museums, in airing it following the premiere.

The Madison Art Cinemas is located at 761 Boston Post Road, Madison CT.

For more information on We Built This House or Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, see www.cbsrz.org or www.ancientandcool.com. Or contact Temple Administrator Wendy Bayor at wendy@cbsrz.net or 860-526-8920.

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Old Lyme Lax Girls Now Play in Postponed State Semifinal This Afternoon

The Lady Wildcats celebrate their victory over Weston.

The Lady Wildcats celebrate their victory over Weston.  Photo by J. Strycharz.

The Old Lyme girl’s CIAC Class S state semifinal against Granby was postponed yesterday until 3:30 p.m. today.  The game will be played at Sage Park in Berlin.

The girls came through convincingly last Thursday to defeat Weston, who had won the Class S state tournament in both 2011 and 2013, by six goals 16-9.  It was an amazing feat and the Wildcats can go into their semifinal game against fifth-seeded Granby with their heads held high.

Click here to read a full report by Ned Griffen and published in The Day and on theday.com June 4.

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CT River Museum Offers Boat Building Workshop in July, Register By June 12

2.Ernstoff Shipyard – The Ernstoff Shipyard, a father and daughter team in 2014 work on their boat.

The Ernstoff Shipyard, a father and daughter team in 2014 work on their boat.

ESSEX — What floats your boat?

In celebration of the Connecticut River’s rich heritage, the Connecticut River Museum is once again offering the CRM 12, a slightly adapted Bevin’s Skiff kit that is produced in limited quantity. The 12′ skiff is reflective of the traditional boats that were built locally in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. With great versatility, these skiffs were used for fishing, rowing and sailing on the River and in the tidal marshes and tributaries. Simple and beautiful, the museum selected the CRM 12 as a good beginner project to build with the help of knowledgeable instructors.

The museum will offer a three-day Boat Building Workshop July 10 – 12. Participants can either do the workshop as individuals or as a group (up to four people). There is no previous boat building experience required to build one of these kits. However, organizers do expect that participants will have basic woodworking knowledge. By the end of the weekend, each individual or group should have a nearly completed boat that is ready for the water. As Ray Gaulke, museum board member and co-organizer stated, “It’s a marvelous way to learn basic boat building and have a product that you can take home.”

Last year’s successful program had four diverse teams — father/daughter, husband/wife, father/son and a Sea Scout troop — successfully build CRM 12’s. “It was a wonderful sight to see participants with little or no boatbuilding experience on Friday rowing their completed boats on the River Sunday afternoon”, said Chris Dobbs, museum executive director.

The CRM 12 kit comes complete with everything needed to build the boat — high-quality marine plywood, fastenings, adhesives, plans and an easy-to-follow manual. Boat builders only need to bring a few basic woodworking tools. The museum commissioned Paul Kessinger, a local wooden boat builder from Guilford, CT to build the first CRM 12 in 2014. Kessinger said that “This is a perfect activity for adults or families. Best yet, you will get years of enjoyment out of rowing or sailing your skiff.”

Space is extremely limited for the boat building workshop. Participants must be at least 10 years old and all children must be accompanied by an adult. The deadline to register is Friday, June 12. The $1,500 program fee ($1,400 for CRM members) includes all the supplies needed to build the CRM 12, oars, and instruction. By the end of the weekend, participants will have a completed boat, ready to be painted and rowed. For more information, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

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Gallery One Artists Exhibit at ELLE Design Studio; Includes Work by Carlisle, Christiano of Old Lyme

Forced Narcissus, by Catherine Christiano, on linen, 14 x 8 inches, 2005.

Forced Narcissus, by Catherine Christiano, on linen, 14 x 8 inches, 2005.

Gallery One, a cooperative of mid-career artists working in a wide variety of media and styles from representational to abstract, including painting, sculpture and works on paper, will exhibit at the ELLE Design Studio from June 2 through Aug. 30, with a reception on Friday, June 5, from 5 to 8 p.m.

“We are very pleased to have this opportunity to exhibit our artists’ work in Chester,” says Judith Barbour Osborne, “and particularly at ELLE Design Studio, both of which are art destinations.”

Gallery One artists include David Brown, Old Saybrook; Ashby Carlisle, Old Lyme; Catherine Christiano, Old Lyme; Bette Ellsworth, Madison; Mary Fussell, Clinton; Gray Jacobik, Deep River; Judith Barbour Osborne, Ivoryton; T. Willie Raney, Ivoryton; Diana Rogers, Clinton; Victoria Sivigny, Meriden; and Jill Vaughn, Ivoryton.

The Artists of Gallery One, whose vision is to provide southeastern Connecticut with a stimulating resource and to support one another artists, exhibit in various locations along the Connecticut shoreline from Stonington to New Haven. The Artists will be showing at the Mystic Arts Center Sept. 25 through Nov. 7 (in the Leibig Gallery). Additional information, the artists and any upcoming exhibitions can be found at www.galleryoneCT.com.

ELLE Design Studio is open from Tuesday through Saturday from 11am until 6pm, Sunday from 10am until 4pm, and by appointment.

For more information, visit Gallery One online at www.galleryoneCT.com and the ELLE Design Studio at elledesignstudio.net

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Roadwork Scheduled in Old Lyme This Weekend

Roadwork is scheduled for the weekend on Buttonball Rd. in Old Lyme. Expect minor delays on the Mile Creek end of Buttonball Rd.  
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Community Music School Presents Two Spring Concerts Featuring Three Musical Groups, June 14

The New Horizons band gather for a photo.

The New Horizons band gather for a photo.

The Community Music School (CMS) presents two spring concerts featuring performing ensembles on Sunday, June 14.

Under the direction of Karli Gilbertson, Glee for Grownups presents, “80’s Broadway Extravaganza,” at 1 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Centerbrook. Accompanied by Sue Sweeney, members will perform solo and ensemble pieces. These vocalists rehearse throughout the semester and never disappoint with a fun and lively concert.

Also, on the same day, the New Horizons Band and Baroque Ensemble perform a Concert in the Park at the Gazebo at Deep River Landing at 4 p.m.

The New Horizons Band is a supportive group for beginners or those who have not played an instrument in years. Directed by Paddy Hurley, the group will perform a varied program of marches, Patriotic music, pop and rock, including performances by their Woodwind Ensemble and Brass Quintet.

The Baroque Ensemble is a 12-piece string group comprised of core members of the CMS String Ensemble and directed by Martha Herrle, and they will be playing works by Vivaldi, Bach and more. The rain location for this concert is the Centerbrook Meetinghouse, 51 Main St., Centerbrook.

Both concerts are free and open to the public. Come and meet the directors and members of each ensemble to find out more about the programs.

The CMS offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30-year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. Community Music School programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives. Visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860-767-0026 for program information.

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Lyme-Old Lyme Rowers Seek Donations for Florida Trip to Compete in Nationals

Photo by Brian Corrigan. Rowing away from the award's dock with their silver medals are (from right to left) Liam Corrigan (stroke), Jeremy Newton, Harry Godfrey Fogg, Joshua Swanski and coxswain Tom Crisp.

Florida bound! Rowing away from the award’s dock with their silver medals are (from right to left) Liam Corrigan (stroke), Jeremy Newton, Harry Godfrey Fogg, Joshua Swanski and coxswain Tom Crisp. Photo by Brian Corrigan.

The Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) crew team, as a whole, has had a very successful season this spring; theirs is a story of which movies are made; an unlikely bunch with the heart, skill and determination of champions.  They medalled at the Founder’s Day regatta for the first time, winning four state championship titles (Girls and Boys 1st and 2nd boats). Then, through the state championship, all four boats qualified to participate in the National School’s Championship Regatta in Virginia this weekend, June 6-7.

After competing at the New England Interscholastic Rowing Association championships (NEIRAs) against the top private schools in New England, the 2nd Boy’s Boat brought home bronze and the 1st Boy’s Varsity Boat won silver, qualifying them for the prestigious 2015 Youth National Championships being held in Sarasota, Fla., June 11-14.

Crew_varsity_1st_boat

The LOLHS Boy’s Varsity 1st Boat crew.

 

Despite a tight budget, LOLHS plans to contribute towards the team’s travel expenses with additional fundraising efforts underway such as today’s carwash to assist with transportation and lodging costs. The team would be grateful to receive any tax deductible contributions which can be made payable to “Old Lyme Rowing Association”, earmarked “NEIRA” and mailed to 6 Stonewood Drive, Old Lyme, CT. 06371

The 1st Boys Varsity four of Liam Corrigan, Harry Godfrey, Jeremy Newton, Josh Swanski and coxswain Tom Crisp, won silver at the Head of the Charles regatta last October against a competitive field of 85 international participants, rowing as the Blood Street Sculls.  They have now gone on to demonstrate that they are as successful in head to head sprints as they are in 5K time trials.

Coach Louis Zubek

Coach Louis Zubek congratulates the boys on their qualification for the US Rowing National Youth Championships – a first for Lyme-Old Lyme High School!

Coached by Louis Zubek and Steve Baranoski, the LOLHS boys and girls 1st  and 2nd boats will row for the National School’s Championship title in Virginia, hoping to improve on the silver and bronze medals that they won last year.

 

When these boys return from Florida, Corrigan and Newton are off to National Selection Camp to seek selection for the US National Team to travel to Rio this summer for the World Rowing Championships.  Corrigan will return briefly to graduate from LOLHS before returning to Pittsburg.

Godfrey, a dual American:Finnish Citizen is off to Finland to perform his National Service, Swanski will be taking up a place on the Division 1 rowing team at Marist College in New York and Crisp will be teaching robotics at The Country School and sailing before entering Colby College in Maine.

Visitors are always welcome to watch the team train on Roger’s Lake.

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Action-Oriented Old Saybrook Chamber Bolsters Business Environment

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The Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce building serves as a ‘gateway’ to Main Street.

The Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce building serves as a ‘gateway’ to Main Street.

Founded in 1939, the Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2014. The more than 500 members are the driving force behind the organization and also form its strong volunteer base. These, in turn, support the Chamber’s two full time employees, Executive Director Judy Sullivan and Member Services Manager Karen Pinette.

Sullivan explains, “Our job is to promote Old Saybrook as a place to work and live and play.” Composed of a diverse group of nonprofits, retail companies, insurance companies, banks, and more, the Chamber unites under their common goals of advancing the economic vitality and improving the quality of life in the community, as well as bringing businesses and new jobs to town.

Executive Director Judy Sullivan

Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Judy Sullivan takes a brief break from her work.

With about 25 percent of Old Saybrook businesses as members, the Chamber accomplishes its ambitious goals through a variety of community events including educational programs on topics ranging from networking and email marketing software to social media publicity and customer service. The Chamber also sponsors an annual Chili-Fest to fund the college scholarship program it runs for students resident in Old Saybrook or children of Chamber members, as well as an annual Arts and Crafts Festival, which is being held this year on July 25 and 26.

In addition, the Chamber has initiated the Chamber Mail program by which every new resident receives information about surrounding businesses, and runs the Chamber Dollars program, a gift certificate program involving over 50 businesses. The Chamber also works frequently with nonprofits on community-oriented projects.

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The smiling faces of Executive Director Judy Sullivan (left) and Membership Services Manager Karen Pinette greet visitors to the light and airy Chamber building.

An important aspect of the Chamber is that they serve as a link between businesses and governments to facilitate lines of communication. Most recently, at ‘Connecticut Business Day at the Capitol,’ Old Saybrook Chamber representatives spoke to senators and representatives about issues facing businesses in the state, such as Connecticut’s 15 percent occupancy tax.

OS_Chamber_Exterior_rearThe Chamber also helps foster inter-business relationships and once a month, a Chamber Connections event is held. These are casual gatherings at various local businesses, which facilitate networking between — and sometimes even within — businesses.

Sullivan grew up in Old Saybrook and graduated from Old Saybrook High School. When her youngest child started school, she fell into her role at the Chamber, first on a part-time basis and ultimately working her way up to executive director. Sullivan notes, “The hardest part of the job is being careful with each action because somebody might be affected. We constantly have to be aware of the impact of any actions we might take. We always want to leave a positive impact.”

She adds, “I’m really proud of the Chamber — it’s been here a long time. I love promoting the town I grew up in. And I find it so rewarding when we see tangible success in businesses.”

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‘Calendar Girls’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse, Fundraising Calendar Now for Sale

Photo by Michelle Tuite. Pictured from left are Maggie McGlone Jennings, Lily Dorment*, Maria Silverman*, Jacqui Hubbard, Beverley Taylor, Katrina Ferguson* *Denotes member of Actors Equity

Photo by Michelle Tuite.
Pictured from left are Maggie McGlone Jennings, Lily Dorment*, Maria Silverman*, Jacqui Hubbard, Beverley Taylor, Katrina Ferguson* *Denotes member of Actors Equity

The summer season has opened in Ivoryton with the US professional premier of one of the UK’s most popular shows, ‘Calendar Girls.’ Adapted by Tim Firth from his smash hit Miramax film of the same name, it is based on an inspiring true story that is both poignant and hilarious.

A group of extraordinary women, members of a very ordinary Yorkshire Women’s Institute, spark a global phenomenon by persuading one another to pose au natural for a charity calendar with a difference. As interest snowballs, the ‘Calendar Girls’ find themselves revealing more than they’d ever planned …

Dazzlingly funny, shamelessly sentimental and utterly captivating, this is one of the best-selling shows in British theatre history. It will make you laugh, cry … and walk out singing Jerusalem!

The fundraising phenomenon of the Calendar Girls was inspired by the death of Angela Baker’s husband, John Richard Baker, an Assistant National Park Officer for the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, who died from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 54 in 1998.

During his illness Angela’s friends began to raise money, initially with the aim of purchasing a sofa for the visitors’ lounge in the hospital where John was treated. Nothing could have prepared them for the way their original calendar took off (selling 202,000 copies in its first year). To date they have raised over £3 million for Leukemia & Lymphoma Research, the UK’s leading blood cancer charity.

To support a selection of local cancer research charities, Ivoryton Playhouse is producing a calendar of the theatre’s Calendar Girls with a portion of the proceeds going to support the work of these organizations featuring the cast in their hilariously “revealing” poses. The June 2015 – May 2016 calendars will be available for purchase from the Ivoryton Playhouse for $20.00. Photography for the calendar was donated by Chris Devlin Photography (http://devlinphotography.com) and the calendar printing is sponsored by Essex Printing.

Jacqui Hubbard, Artistic/Executive Director, is directing the production and is also stepping on stage in the role of Annie. Beverley Taylor, Ivoryton Company Manager, will be joining her in the role of Chris.

“We are both Northern English lasses” says Hubbard, “I spent four years trying to get the rights to produce this wonderful play and, though directing and performing at the same time will be a challenge, I knew I had to do it. These women are in our bones and it will be a rare treat to get to step in front of the curtain for a change.”

Joining them on stage are Vickie Blake, Danielle Bonanno, Erik Bloomquist, Victoria Bundonis*, R. Bruce Connelly*, Lily Dorment*, David Edwards*, Katrina Ferguson*, Maggie McGlone Jennings, and Maria Silverman*.

Set design is by Tony Andrea, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Cully Long.

Calendar Girls opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on June 3, and runs through June 21. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

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‘Town’ Category Added to This Year’s Chester Fair Photo Contest, All Welcome to Enter

What makes a town special? Take a picture.

An appealing category, Town Photo, has been added to the annual Chester Fair Photography Contest for 2015. Photos should capture the spirit and/or beauty of any Connecticut town. First, second and third place ribbons and prizes will be awarded.

As a bonus, Events Magazine will be selecting a photo from this category to appear on the cover of one of its quarterly town-wide publications.

This year’s Chester Fair will be held August 28-30 at the Chester Fairgrounds. Full Chester Fair information, including the complete entry guide, can be found at www.chesterfair.org.

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Chester Opposition Delays Vote on Proposed School District Full Regionalization Plan

REGION 4 — Plans for a three-town referendum vote on a proposed kindergarten-sixth grade regionalization plan have been pushed back after a meeting Monday between district and town leaders brought information about a possible new option for dividing elementary education costs among the three towns, and highlighted opposition to the current regionalization plan from elected officials in Chester.
The special meeting, which included board of education chairpersons and members of the boards of selectmen and finance for the district towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex, came after the Chester boards of selectmen and finance issued a statement declaring unanimous opposition to the current plan and a related inter-local agreement intended to address cost shifts and other issues arising from full regionalization of the elementary schools. School board members had been planning for a possible Sept. 29 referendum on K-6 regionalization, which must be approved by voters of all three towns.
The Chester statement, drafted at a May 28 meeting of the two boards, contended the proposed plan and agreement would have a “negative financial impact” on Chester. In a reflection of concerns that declining student enrolment and full regionalization could lead to grade moves or even a closure of Chester Elementary school, the statement also calls for local voter approval, by town meeting vote or referendum, of any shifts of grades among the elementary schools.
Chester finance board member Lori Clymas urged school leaders to “slow down” and explore further revisions to the plan. “We want to work it out but we feel; like we’re being rushed.” she said. Chester First Selectman Edmund Meehan said the plan that was developed over the past three months needs further review, while adding, “We don’t have to go back to square one.”
Essex Board of Education Chairman Lon Seidman, a strong supporter of the K-6 regionalization, said new legislation approved last week in the state House of Representatives would give the school district greater flexibility in assessing taxpayers in each town regarding the cost of operating the elementary schools. Current state law requires using student average daily membership (ADM) from each town to divide cost shares in a regional school budget, as has been done with the spending plan for the middle school and high school since the Region 4 school district for grades 7-12 was established in the early 1950s.
Current levels of enrollment and per pupil spending would leave Deep River at a $378,000 financial disadvantage in 2016-2017 under a K-6 grade regionalization and budget split based only on student ADM. To address this and build support in Deep River, a draft inter-local agreement would adjust budget shares, with Chester and Essex paying higher budget shares in amounts projected to range from $201,000 to $173,000 for Chester over the next four years and from $177,000 to $65,000 for Essex through 2019-2020.
Seidman said the legislation pushed by State Rep. Phil Miller (D-36th) would allow the district to develop its own plan for sharing elementary school expenses. He acknowledged a full review of options under the new legislation would require a delay in any votes on the K-6 regionalization. The new legislation still needs approval from the State Senate, with the 2015 legislation session scheduled to end at midnight Wednesday.
The Chester call for a local vote on elementary school grade changes also generated discussion Monday, with school board members urging the Chester officials to be more flexible on the process for approving grade reconfigurations at the elementary schools. Superintendent of Schools Ruth Levy said any major shifts in elementary school grades are unlikely over the next four years, except for a possible move of sixth graders to John Winthrop Middle School, commenting, “We’re getting mired down over control and we need to come together.”
Region 4 Board of Education Chairman Chris Riley said his board, which by law must initiate referenda on further regionalization, would defer any vote on sending the plan to a referendum in September. Riley noted a regionalization referendum on Nov. 3, when the three towns hold municipal elections, is still possible, but far from certain.
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Lyme Public Hall Annual Meeting June 11 to Feature William Hosley

William Hosley

William Hosley

The Lyme Public Hall Association will hold its Annual  Meeting and Pot Luck Dinner on  Thursday, June 11, at 6 p.m.

The meeting will feature William Hosley, who will give a presentation titled, “The  Importance of Community Organizations in the Preservation of Local Culture and History.” An outspoken advocate for the preservation of the rich cultural history of Connecticut, Hosley brings more than 30 years of experience in art, antiques and history organizations to his entertaining lectures.

The program is free and open to the public.  Bring a main course, salad or dessert to share (beverages, plates and utensils provided.)

The Lyme Public Hall is located at 249 Hamburg Road (Rte. 156) in Lyme, Conn.

For  more information, visit www.lymepublichall.org or call (860) 526-8886.

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