August 31, 2015

Exhibit by Old Lyme’s Acclaimed Photographer Burt on Show at CT River Museum

Tri-colored heron ©Wm Burt (15.2 x 20)

Tri-colored heron ©Wm Burt (15.2 x 20)

An exhibition of photos by William Burt of Old Lyme titled, “Water Babies – The Hidden Lives of Baby Wetland Birds,” is on show at the Connecticut River Museum through Oct. 12, at the Connecticut River Museum. This is the fourth of William Burt’s photo exhibitions, each based on one of his books, to show at the Museum.

The exhibition features 40 framed archival pigment prints, all made by the photographer, and 18 text panels quoting passages from the book of the same name. The pieces are sequenced such that every “water baby” is juxtaposed with the adult bird it becomes.

For 40 years, photographer William Burt has chased after the birds few people see: first rails, then bitterns, nightjars, and other skulkers – and now these, elusive creatures of a very different kind: the Water Babies. They are the subjects of his coming book, and also this exhibition at the Connecticut River Museum in Essex. The book will be published in October 2015 by W. W. Norton/Countryman.

Red-necked phalarope ©Wm Burt

Red-necked phalarope ©Wm Burt

The “babies” are the downy young of ducks, grebes, gallinules and shorebirds, herons, and other wetland birds – those that get their feet wet, as it were – and challenging they are, to birder and photographer alike: quick-footed, wary, and well-camouflaged, to say the least; and temporary.

You have only a week or two each year in which to find them. But above all else, they are endearing. From the comic-monster herons to the fuzzy ducklings and stick-legged sandpipers, these tots have personality, and spunk. You see it in their faces, each and every one.

To find these youngsters and adults, Burt prowled their wetland breeding grounds each spring and summer for some seven years, all over North America, from the Arctic Circle to the Gulf of Mexico. The result is a portrait of these wild birds of the wetlands as both young and old, unknown and known, new and familiar.

Burt is a naturalist, writer, and photographer with a passion for wild places and elusive birds – especially marshes, and the shy birds within. His feature stories are seen in Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, and other magazines, and he has written three previous books: Shadowbirds (1994); Rare & Elusive Birds of North America (2001); and Marshes: The Disappearing Edens (2007).

Burt’s photo exhibitions have been shown at some 35 museums across the U.S. and Canada. He lives in Old Lyme, Conn.

For more information on this and other museum programs, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main St., Essex and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 860-767-8269 or visit www.ctrivermuseum.org.

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Auditions for Community Music School Jazz Ensemble, Sept. 12

Auditions for the CMS Jazz Ensemble will be held Sept. 12.

Auditions for the CMS Jazz Ensemble will be held Sept. 12.

CENTERBROOK –- Auditions for the Community Music School (CMS) Jazz Ensemble will be held on Saturday, Sept. 12, beginning at 9:30 a.m. at the School, located at 90 Main St. in Centerbrook.

Directed by Tom Briggs, the ensemble is for students ages 13 to 18 with a strong interest in jazz performance and learning more about improvisation. Instrumental students on trumpet, trombone, flute, clarinet, saxophone, and guitar are encouraged to audition.

Call CMS at 860-767-0026 to schedule a 20-minute audition timeslot. The regular Jazz Ensemble rehearsal schedule begins on Saturday, Sept. 19, at 10 a.m.

The CMS offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. Community Music School programs cultivate musical ability and creativity, and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

For additional information about the Jazz Ensemble and other CMS programs, visit www.community-music-school.org

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NL County Residents Receive Free Admission on Second Sundays to Flo Gris Museum, Next Date Sept. 13

During Free Summer Second Sundays, visitors can enjoy the exhibition All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York as well as a variety of outdoor activities and hands-on projects.

During Free Summer Second Sundays, visitors can enjoy the exhibition All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York as well as a variety of outdoor activities and hands-on projects.

Thanks to a grant from the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut, all residents of New London County receive free admission to the Florence Griswold Museum on second Sundays this summer – the last remaining dates of the season is Sept. 13.

The Museum’s riverfront landscape is situated on an 11-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme. In addition to the restored Florence Griswold House, where a generation of Impressionist artists lived, the Museum features an exhibition gallery, education and landscape centers, extensive gardens, and a restored artist’s studio.

Pictured from the 'All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York' exhibition, James Edward Buttersworth’s Yacht Race off Fort Wadsworth, ca. 1870 from the Museum of the City of New York.

Pictured from the ‘All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York’ exhibition, James Edward Buttersworth’s Yacht Race off Fort Wadsworth, ca. 1870 from the Museum of the City of New York.

Visitors to Summer Second Sundays will enjoy, All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York, an exhibition of that highlights the Museum of the City of New York’s renowned marine art collection. From folk art gems to Hudson River School panoramas to moody Tonalist contemplations of man and sea, these works capture the excitement of the age of sail and steam.

Visitors can also tour the historic Florence Griswold House, restored to its appearance as the boardinghouse for the Lyme Art Colony, stroll through Miss Florence’s historic gardens, and relax along the banks of the Lieutenant River. Can You Find Me cards in the gallery and a scavenger hunt in the historic house make the trip both fun and educational for families.

Visitors of any age can drop in at the Museum’s Education Center for a quick painting lesson before heading down to the river or out in the garden for an afternoon of plein-air painting. All materials included. The new outdoor Art Cart invites exploration of the grounds through interactive, hands-on projects.

“Free Summer Second Sundays is a great way for the Museum to make new friends in New London County,” notes David D.J. Rau, the Museum’s Director of Education and Outreach. He adds, “We are grateful for the support of The Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut.”

New London County residents can enjoy Free Summer Second Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. with proof of residency. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The Museum is located at 96 Lyme St., Old Lyme, exit 70 off I-95.

For additional information, contact the Museum at 860-434-5542 or visit www.FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org.

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Literacy Volunteers Seek Trainee Tutors to Help Valley Shore Residents

AREAWIDE — Literacy Volunteers Valley Shore (LVVS), CT, Inc. is a private non-profit organization. Its mission is to train tutors to teach Basic Reading (BR) and English as a Second Language (ESL) to residents of the Valley Shore area, who wish to improve their reading, writing or speaking English to improve their life and work skills. This one-to-one instruction is held confidential and is completely without charge to the student.

Tutor training is a 14-hour program conducted over seven sessions held each fall and again in the spring each year. The next training session begins Sept. 17, and runs through Nov. 12. Registration for the fall session is open now and the deadline for applications is Aug. 28.

Workshop Leaders have developed a comprehensive program that provides prospective tutors the skills and resources to help them succeed. A background in education is not necessary – just a desire to tutor and a commitment to helping a student improve their skill in basic literacy or English as a Second Language over the period of one year after the completion of training.

If you are interested in becoming a tutor, contact the Literacy Volunteers office in the lower level of Westbrook’s Public Library by phone at 860-399-0280 or e-mail at jferrara@vsliteracy.org.

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Acton Public Library Presents Repro of Infamous Mercer-Williams House

OLD SAYBROOK — For the months of August and September, the Acton Library in Old Saybrook will be hosting a reproduction of the Mercer-Williams House. The reproduction was painstakingly made by Maribel Girnius.

The house and the infamous crime that occurred in it were the focus of the book and film Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt.

The Acton Library is open from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

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Acton Library Hosts Job Search Boot Camp; Third Session Covers Interview Questions, Aug. 31

CTWORKS Job Search Boot Camp will be held at Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook on three dates this summer as follows:

  • Monday, June 29: to discuss interview questions
  • Monday, July 27 : to discuss job search tools
  • Monday, Aug. 31: to discuss questions to ask employers during the interview

Boot Camp brings area people together who are unemployed or in career transition. These programs are free and presented by CTWORKS.

To register, call the Library 860-395-3184 or email TSells.ctwbs@ct.gov or for more information visit the library online at www.actonpubliclibrary.org.

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It was Another Magnificent Midsummer Festival in Old Lyme …

Can you believe it’s been a full week since the Midsummer Festival was held in Old Lyme? Here (finally!) is our traditional photo essay of the event for which — yet again — the weather cooperated offering clear skies and warm air right through from Friday evening when concert-goers gathered behind the Florence Griswold Museum to Saturday night when fireworks lit up the sky behind the high school — all in all, it was — yet again — a positively perfect Festival!

Enjoying the Friday night concert on the Florence Griswold's lawn on the banks of the Lieutenant River.

Festival-goers enjoyed the Friday night concert on the Florence Griswold’s lawn on the banks of the Lieutenant River …

... and the stunning sunset looking west.

… and watching the stunning sunset looking west.

MSF_2015_Love_Lily

Saturday morning Lyme Street was a hive of activity, especially outside Patricia Spratt’s home goods business, which was also hosting clothes from her daughter Lilly’s original fashion line.

MSF_2015

Food and more was on offer at the Lyme Street Firehouse.

MSF_2015_LAA_bull

And down at the Lyme Art Association, some four-legged folk had moved in …

MSF_2015

… and, as always, were drawing quite a crowd.

MSF_2015

There was music everywhere …

... and vegetables ...

… and vegetables …

... and flowers ...

… and flowers …

... and jams and jellies ......

… and jams … and jellies ……

... and olive oils!

… and olive oils!

.. and sheer delight  for this little girl as she plucked a violin string for this Wandering Minstrel!

And, perhaps summing up the Festival, we catch the sheer delight of a little girl as she plucked a violin string for this wandering minstrel!

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Caroline’s Miracle Foundation Event Draws More Than 500 Runners

Ready to run ...

Ready to run …

The weather was perfect Saturday as more than 500 runners and walkers of all ages started to gather in front of Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School from 6:30 a.m. onward to participate in the three races being held that day to support Caroline’s Miracle Foundation (CMF).  It had previously been announced that this would be the final time that the event would be held.

Shortly before 8 a.m. when the 5K race began, a large crowd thronged the starting line.

Shortly before 8 a.m. when the 5K race began, a large crowd thronged the starting line.

The O’Brien family came together for a photo (below.)  It was their eldest daughter Caroline, who passed away in July 2010 from Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) – a rare and inoperable form of brain cancer — at age 11, who formed CMF prior to her death. All proceeds from the event support the Foundation.

The mission of CMF is to bring smiles to the faces of children battling brain tumors and other serious illnesses, as well as supporting safety initiatives in Old Lyme.  To see some of the ways the foundation has brightened the lives of these children, visit carolinesmiraclefoundation.org.

The O'Brien family stand at the starting line.

The O’Brien family stand at the starting line.

After the race, some of the innumerable volunteers posed for a photo in their T-shirts spanning all five years of the event.

Some of the loyal volunteers, many of whom have served through all five years that the event has been held.

Some of the loyal volunteers, many of whom have served through all five years that the event has been held.

A total of 316 runners finished the 5K race.  The other two events were a 5K walk and a Kid’s K.

Twenty-five year-old James Rosenberger was the overall winner of the 5K with a time of 18.08.3.  The fastest woman was 19-year-old Sarah Hammond who completed the 5K course in 20.40.4.  Medals were awarded for the first, second and third placed runners in each age category.

Click here to view a full list of the race results.

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Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce Presents Scholarships, Grants to Local Students at Annual Meeting

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber honors its scholarship winners. From left to right are State Senator Paul Formica, Eli Kuhn, Sloane Sweitzer, Gabriel Barclay, Brett Hartmann and State Representative Devin Carney.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber honors its scholarship winners. From left to right are State Senator Paul Formica, Eli Kuhn, Sloane Sweitzer, Gabriel Barclay, Brett Hartmann and State Representative Devin Carney.

Gabriel Barclay, Brett Hartmann, and Sloane Sweitzer are the 2015 recipients of the N. Rutherford Sheffield Memorial Award for Entrepreneurial Promise and Achievement from the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce. The award was established in 1999 by the Chamber in honor of Mr. Sheffield, who served the Chamber for over 50 years, and was a leader in many community organizations.

Elijah Kuhn, entering his senior year at the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the College of New Haven, received the Scholarship Award for Achievement in the Visual Arts. Mr. Kuhn has received the award from the Chamber for each of his years at the College.

All four students were also acknowledged with Proclamations from the State Legislature presented by State Senator Paul Formica and State Representative Devin Carney, who attended the Annual Meeting, and State Senator Art Linares.

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce Scholarship program has awarded over $30,000 in scholarships and grants to local students since its inception. The Chamber Scholarship Fund is supported through donations to CMRK clothing donation bins located in Lyme and Old Lyme: at the Lyme Firehouse, behind The Bowerbird, at 151 Boston Post Road, and on Route 156 at Shoreline Mowers.

Outgoing President Catherine Frank Honored for Service by State Senator Formica, State Rep. Carney

Outgoing Chamber President receives a Proclamation from the State Legislature from State Senator Paul Formica (left) and State Representative Devin Carney (right).

Outgoing Chamber President receives a Proclamation from the State Legislature from State Senator Paul Formica (left) and State Representative Devin Carney (right).

Outgoing Chamber President Catherine Frank was also acknowledged for her exemplary service to the Chamber with a Proclamation from the State Legislature presented by State Senator Paul Formica and State Representative Devin Carney, who attended the Annual Meeting, and State Senator Art Linares.

Mark Griswold and Olwen Logan, the newly-elected President and Vice-President respectively of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce.

Mark Griswold and Olwen Logan, the newly-elected President and Vice-President respectively of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce.

Mark Griswold was elected the new President of the Chamber and Olwen Logan was elected Vice-President.

Information about the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber is available at www.visitoldlyme.com.

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Old Lyme Youth Program Featured at Washington DC Juvenile Justice Conference

From left to right, Missy Garvin, Youth Programs Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau,  Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors Julia Strycharz and Taylor Hamparian, and Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane at the annual conference of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington, DC.

From left to right, Missy Garvin, Youth Programs Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau, stands with Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors Julia Strycharz and Taylor Hamparian, and Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane at the annual conference of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington, DC.

On June 11, members of the Old Lyme Youth and Police group known as ‘Cop Club’ highlighted their four-year-old program at the Coalition for Juvenile Justice 2015 Annual Conference in Washington DC.

Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane and Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) senior Julia Strycharz were panelists during the presentation titled, “Increasing Positive Relations between Police and Youth.”  This presentation was included in the conference’s Welcome and General Session, which highlighted the importance of positive relations between police and young people.

Lane and Strycharz described the local efforts in Connecticut that bring law enforcement and youth together around jointly planned projects.

A collaborative project between the Old Lyme Police and the Lyme’s Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), was awarded $10,000 in grants administered by the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee in 2011, 2012 and 2013 to establish a youth and police program.  The youth programs are required to provide leadership roles for the youth and non-authoritarian roles for police officers.

Julia Strycharz presents at the conference.

Julia Strycharz presents at the conference.

 

Initially called ‘Operation LOL,’ LOLHS students and police collaborated in the writing of the grant.  The program has a goal of creating opportunities for youth and police to get to know each other through a series of monthly planned activities. These activities promote positive youth development, strengthen relationships between youth and police, and also help the community through a group service project.

Since being awarded the grant, youth and police have jointly planned fun monthly activities, including trips to New York City, Mount Monadnock,  a trampoline park, go-kart racing, snow tubing, bowling and an annual table tennis tournament held at LYSB.  Officer Lane said “Nothing builds friendships better than sharing ice cream together after getting beaten by the youth in a game of ping pong.”

Over 60 Lyme and Old Lyme youth have participated in ‘Cop Club’ since its inception.  The Connecticut Youth and Police grant permitted a maximum of three years funding for any one program.  Due to this, in 2014 the Town of Old Lyme decided to continue their commitment and fund this successful program.  The Old Lyme Police Union has also contributed monthly to ‘Cop Club’ for the past four years.

One of the requirements for Old Lyme Police Officers to participate in “Cop Club” was to attend a mandatory training in ‘Effective Police Interaction with Youth.’  This training provides patrol officers with information to understand youth behaviors better and provides practical strategies for interaction with young people in positive ways.

Officer Lane (left) and Julia Strycharz (right) were participants in a panel discussion at the 2015 Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington DC.

Officer Lane (left) and Julia Strycharz (right) were participants in a panel discussion at the 2015 Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington DC.

 

From this training, officers became better equipped to communicate effectively with young people they encountered and increased the likelihood that interactions with youth would result in positive outcomes.  Old Lyme Police Officers learned about the problem of inequitable treatment of minority and white youth in the juvenile justice system.

They discussed approaches for collaborating with youth officers and identified the benefits of taking a more supportive approach to dealing with youth.   Eventually, two thirds of the Old Lyme Police received this training and actively participated in the youth and police program.

In his remarks Officer Lane added, “Within my first year in Old Lyme, I realized that the Old Lyme Police Department had little to no involvement with the community’s youth and I began to develop this program with LYSB.  As for the experience being rewarding, the transformation of attitudes toward youth by police officers, who had previously little contact with this age group, was immediately visible.”

Getting to know other conference delegates over meals was an especially enjoyable part of the conference.

Getting to know other conference delegates over meals was an especially enjoyable part of the conference.

Strycharz commented, “I was a little nervous to be speaking to an audience of 300 people, mostly juvenile justice professionals.  I told them how our relationships and friendships are invaluable. Not only did the youth develop a new-found-opinion of the policemen of this town, but as the word spread about the club, the new attitude about the policemen also spread too.”

She continued, “The ‘Cop Club’ has changed the culture school-wide.  The youth of our town are not afraid of the policemen anymore. If they happen to be in the school, or at a sporting event, students aren’t afraid to approach them and say hello, ask them a question, or casually talk to them.”

Group_photo_DC_v2

Joining Lane and Strycharz at the conference were LYSB Programs Coordinator Missy Garvin and LOLHS senior Taylor Hamparian.    Garvin said “We are very proud of the success of our program in Old Lyme and it’s an honor for us to be highlighted at this national juvenile justice conference in Washington.  LYSB and the Old Lyme Police have created a valuable partnership, which will benefit both our youth and the police in our town for years to come.”

She added enthusiastically, “I can’t wait to start planning our next group to start in the fall.”

 

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In Honor of Father’s Day, We Proudly Celebrate ‘Men Against Domestic Violence’

logoIn honor of Father’s Day, we are proud to support Safe Futures (formerly the Women’s Center of Southeastern Connecticut), the organization which saves lives, restores hope, and changes the future for those impacted by domestic violence and sexual assault in southeastern Connecticut.

Founded in 1976 as the Women’s Center of Southeastern Connecticut , Safe Futures began as an information and referral service for women entering the workforce.  Today, Safe Futures operates two 24-hour hotlines, an emergency shelter, and a transitional living program for families working to rebuild lives shattered by domestic violence or sexual assault.

Safe Futures also provides counseling and advocacy, case management, court advocacy, support groups, and educational programs for schools and community groups.  All 21 towns, including Lyme and Old Lyme, in New London County are served by the agency.

We are pleased to donate space for the coming week to publish Safe Futures’ annual announcement of “Men Against Domestic Violence”

This announcement lists the names of men and organizations :

  • who have made a contribution to the grassroots campaign in which men take a stand against all forms of violence against women
  • whose work Safe Futures is recognizing on their behalf
  • who have shown support by their engagement, involvement and actions

The list names role models and advocates, educators and upstanders.  Domestic violence feeds on silence.  With this listing, Safe Futures breaks the silence of domestic violence and emphasizes that domestic violence affects everyone.

Click here to view the announcement.

For more information on Safe Futures and/or to support their valuable work with a donation, click here to visit their website.

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Acton Library Hosts Three Job Search Boot Camp Sessions; First on Interview Questions, June 29

CTWORKS Job Search Boot Camp will be held at Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook on three dates this summer as follows:

  • Monday, June 29: to discuss interview questions
  • Monday, July 27 :to discuss job search tools
  • Monday, Aug. 31: to discuss questions to ask employers during the interview

Boot Camp brings area people together who are unemployed or in career transition. These programs are free and presented by CTWORKS.

To register, call the Library 860-395-3184 or email TSells.ctwbs@ct.gov or for more information visit the library online at www.actonpubliclibrary.org.

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Registration Open for Fundraising Valley Shore Y Golf Tournament to be Held July 20

East-Lyme-AS-EnrichmentThe 24th annual Valley Shore Y Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 20, at the Clinton Country Club.

The 24th annual Valley Shore Y Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 20, at the Clinton Country Club.

The event helps raise funds for the YMCA’s Annual Campaign supporting the Y’s scholarships and community health initiatives, which truly impact families in our community. The goal of the tournament is to raise enough funds to ensure no one is turned away from any Y program for the inability to pay.

The foursome entry fee is $1,000 and individual fee is $250. Each entry includes:

  • 18 holes of golf, with a cart for four
  • Buffet lunch
  • Dinner
  • On Course Beverages
  • Prizes and Awards such as Hot Ball Raffle and Hole in One for a car
  • Individual and team prizes
  • Putting Contest

Golfers may find registration information at http://vsymca.org/golf-classic/. Sponsorship opportunities are still available.

For additional information, contact Tony Sharillo at tsharillo@vsymca.org or 860.399.9622 ext. 107.

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Old Lyme’s Woman’s Exchange Donates $3,000 to Local Charities

Ali Brinkman (President, Simply Sharing), Cathy Zall  (New London Homeless Hospitality Center), Mary Crist (Treasurer, Woman's Exchange), Dale Malcarne (President, Woman’s Exchange) and Laverne Alexander (Grant Chairwoman)

Woman’s Exchange grant givers and presenters gather for a photo, from left to right, Ali Brinkman (President, Simply Sharing), Cathy Zall (New London Homeless Hospitality Center), Mary Crist (Treasurer, Woman’s Exchange), Dale Malcarne (President, Woman’s Exchange) and Laverne Alexander (Grant Chairwoman)

Grants totaling $2,000 were presented by The Lyme Tree Woman’s Exchange of Old Lyme to two local non-profit organizations at the store in the Old Lyme Marketplace on Monday, June 15.  Organizations receiving the grants included the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, Inc. and the Simply Sharing of Essex.

The Woman’s Exchange also made a donation of $1,000 to the Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries to purchase food for distribution to those in need along the Connecticut shoreline.

The Women’s Exchange is located in the Old Lyme Marketplace and is a wonderful place to shop for unique gifts, jewelry and decorative items.  Many of the items are consigned to the shop for sale by crafters and all profits, after expenses, are donated to charity.

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Lyme-Old Lyme HS 1st Boy’s Four in US National Final Today, Varsity Four Boats Sweep National School’s Championship

06/14 Update: The Lyme-Old Lyme High School Boy’s Varsity Four boat has qualified for the US Rowing National Youth Championship final today at Sarasota, Fla., at 1:01 p.m. The boat’s crew is Liam Corrigan (stroke), Josh Swanski, Jeremy “Remy” Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox). The race will be broadcast live on US Rowing’s YouTube channel.

GO LYME-OLD LYME!!

An extraordinary feat -- every Lyme-Old Lyme HS rower who went to the National regatta won a gold medal.

An extraordinary feat — every Lyme-Old Lyme HS rower who went to the National School’s Championship Regatta won a gold medal.

It was not only a perfect day on June 7 in terms of the weather when the crews of the Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) men’s and women’s 1st and 2nd varsity four boats competed in the National School’s Championship Regatta — but the result were perfect too.  In an extraordinary result for undoubtedly the smallest school competing — and a public one at that – all four boats won gold medals.

The crew of the girl's second boat celebrate their win.

The crew of the girl’s second boat celebrate their win.

The regatta, held in Fairfax County, Va., on the Occoquan River, is for school rowing programs that qualify from various regional and state competitions to race for a national scholastic title.  Clubs representing 13 states qualified and competed this year.

The boy's second boat in action.

The boy’s second boat in action.

Four LOLHS crews (20 athletes) qualified to represent Connecticut based on their State Championship at the Connecticut Public Schools Regatta in May.

The girls 2nd boat pose with their coach Steve Baranoski and their medals. From left to right, Lauren Dolishny,  Alexis Kolar, Caleigh O'Neil, Hannah Wilczewski and Francesca Melluzzo (cox).

The girls 2nd boat pose with their coach Steve Baranoski and their medals. From left to right, Lauren Dolishny, Alexis Kolar, Caleigh O’Neil, Hannah Wilczewski and Francesca Melluzzo (cox).

The girls 2nd boat, stroked by Hannah Wilczewski, defeated winning crews from Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Kentucky in the finals to take the gold with a time of 5:39.1 for the 1500m course.

The boys second boat stand with their coach Louis Zubek and their medals. From left to right, Peter Fuchs, Adam Drummond, Julia Morrison (cox) Brandon Green and Jacob Olson.

The boys second boat stand with their coach Louis Zubek and their medals. From left to right, Peter Fuchs, Adam Drummond, Julia Morrison (cox) Brandon Green and Jacob Olson.

The girl’s win was followed with the boy’s 2nd boat, stroked by Peter Fuchs, who were victors over crews from Massachusetts, Virginia, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania in the finals to take the gold with a time of 5:01.6.

The girl’s first boat (at rear in photo) taste victory at the winning line.

The crew of the girl's first boat proudly display their medals. From left to right, Steve Baranoski (coach), Christiana Congdon, Hannah Paynter, Claudia Mergy (cox), Allison Murphy and Maria Boyle.

The crew of the girl’s first boat proudly display their medals. From left to right, Steve Baranoski (coach), Christiana Congdon, Hannah Paynter, Claudia Mergy (cox), Allison Murphy and Maria Boyle.

After winning the qualifying heat in the morning, the girl’s 1st boat, stroked by Christiana Congdon, won with a time of 5:32.1 against crews from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Virginia.

The crew of the boy's first boat show their determination to reach the winning line first.

The crew of the boy’s first boat show their determination to reach the winning line first.

Similarly, after advancing through the qualifying heats in the morning, the boy’s 1st boat (borrowed from Glastonbury, as the Old Lyme boat was on a trailer to Florida), stroked by Liam Corrigan, completed the sweep by defeating crews from New Hampshire, New Jersey, Washington (D.C) and Massachusetts, with a winning time of 4:55.4.

The boy's first boat gather for team photo with coach Louis Zubek and their gold medals. From left to right standing are Josh Swanski, Liam Corrigan, Jeremy "Remy" Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox) in front row.

The boy’s first boat gather for team photo with coach Louis Zubek and their gold medals. From left to right standing are Josh Swanski, Liam Corrigan, Jeremy “Remy” Newton and Harry Godfrey-Fogg with Thomas Crisp (cox) in front row.

The boys 1st boat has now arrived in Florida to represent LOLHS this weekend at the US Rowing National Youth Championships — the premier sprint race for Under 19s in the country.

Go Wildcats!

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Lyme Farmers Market is Open for Summer Season, Saturdays

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

The perennially popular Lyme Farmers Market at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme opens again Saturday from around 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.

But the sad news this year is that the irrepressible, larger-than-life impresario of the market, Chip Dahlke, has announced this will be his last season with the market, “Unless…” and this is Chip’s endearing dry humor rising to the surface, “… a deranged individual or some goody two-shoes organization wants to take on the burden.”

In his ever upbeat, positive spirit, however, Chip urges, “Let’s make this summer one to remember.  The field should be full of vendors and the entertainment the best of what we’ve had for the last 12 years,” adding with his usual sharp wit, “There’s still not going to be eggplant carving contests, erotic vegetable displays, or god forbid poodle parades.”

tentsThe big draw of farmers’ markets is, of course, the fresh, local produce.  What makes the one in Lyme  so special is that it’s held on a real farm.  And since this is the Lyme countryside, it’s as a pretty as a picture.  In fact, Ashlawn Farm is a magnet for local artists who are attracted by its beauty—the old white homestead, the red barns, and the stone walls crisscrossing the pastures. An original member of the Connecticut Farmers Market Trail, Ashlawn Farm is located at 78 Bill Hill Rd. in Lyme.

The farm is celebrating its 126th anniversary this year.  Ray Harding, a dairy farmer, bought Ashlawn in 1909.  Today his grandson Chip lives there with his wife Carol and their three children.  By profession, Chip is a portfolio manager and Carol runs her popular coffee-roasting business in one of the old barns on the property.

As always, Dahlke has lined up a stellar selection of vendors, which includes:

TALK Seafood
Four Root FarmflowersThe vendors change week by week but you can be certain that every Saturday morning from June to October, tents will go up in front of barns and local purveyors will sell vegetables, fruit, breads, cheese, meat, soaps, chicken, fish, fiber, specialty food, crafts, flowers, herbs, eggs, seafood and more.  Music will be played — Dogbite are performing on Opening Day –and Chip will surely spring a few Saturday surprises!Before the Market opens, Ashlawn Farm Yoga will be held at 8 a.m. each Saturday on the grass beyond the parking field for all levels. The class is taught by Lisa Tompkins Nasser. Drop in for only $15, which includes a free Ashlawn Farm cup of Coffee.

Sign up for Chip’s entertaining weekly e-newsletter here

Like Lyme Farmers Market on Facebook hereAnd, most of all, follow Chip’s advice to make it a summer to remember at the Market — see you there!

Editor’s Note:
 Extracts of this article are taken from one written by Linda Ahnert that was originally published on LymeLine.com  in June 2009.
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Historic Waterfront Tours Scheduled in Deep River During Summer

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town's waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town’s waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River’s commercial connection to the rest of the world started at the end of Kirtland and River Streets in the early 1800’s. What is now known as the Town Landing, was a shipyard and dock, which collectively, were the linchpin to Deep River’s mercantile success. The shipbuilding provided the vessels and the dock provided the point of delivery of raw materials and the shipment of end products, that made Deep River an economic success.

A lecture and tour of Deep River’s Historic Waterfront will be offered every second and fourth Saturday morning, this June, July, August and September. Tours are sponsored by the Deep River Historical Society. The tour will start at the home of sea captain and ship builder, Calvin Williams, at 131 Kirtland Street, (immediately left of the Mt. Saint John entrance pillars), starting at 10 a.m. SHARP, each tour day. Each tour is expected to be about 1 1/2 hour duration and will start punctually at 10 a.m.

Reservations are recommended and tickets may be acquired at the door, or in advance, from the program’s director: James Hogan, by calling 860-391-2354, or at two convenient store locations: Celebrations, 161 Main Street, Deep River and Old Saybrook Antiques Center, 756 Middlesex Turnpike, Old Saybrook.

The costs for tickets is $20 per family; $10 adults; $5 students and senior citizens. 100% of all donations will benefit the Deep River Historical Society. All donations are tax deductable. Program is “rain or shine”.

For more information, call James J. Hogan III at: 860-391-2354

Tour Dates are:
June: 13 and 27
July: 11 and 25
August: 8 and 22
September: 12 and 26

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Film on LeWitt’s Landmark Synagogue set for World Premiere at Madison Cinema, Sunday

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CHESTER — Complete with a red carpet, the Madison Art Cinemas will host the June 14 world premiere of We Built This House, a one-hour film telling the story of Chester synagogue Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ)—known as a global art landmark for being the only public building that acclaimed artist Sol LeWitt ever designed.

Film producer-director Jon Joslow, a lifetime member of the Congregation, will discuss the movie and a reception will follow the screening. Tickets are open to the public and may be obtained for a donation of $18 each through the synagogue office, 860 526 8920. The start time is 11 a.m. Paparazzi are welcome.

In a 2013 profile, Town & Country‘s arts editor compared the striking Chester sanctuary with a masterpiece chapel Henri Matisse created in Nice, France. But the synagogue, opened in 2001, started as a napkin sketch. LeWitt first drew a structure inspired by traditional wooden temples of Eastern Europe combined with elements of colonial New England barns.

worshipWe Built This House traces how architect Stephen Lloyd translated LeWitt’s vision into post and beam, and how the Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek community collaborated and improvised—even adapting a design discovered in a medieval English watermill—to give structure to the sanctuary’s wooden dome. LeWitt’s iconic installation on the ark drew national attention when the building opened; it prompted Town & Country to observe “modern art as [the sanctuary’s] focal point.”

LeWitt, a Chester resident who died at 78 in 2007, is recognized as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century. The sanctuary has become known as one of the most astonishing, and spiritually welcoming, religious spaces in the world.

True to its roots, Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek has become one of the shoreline’s most vital cultural centers. Its Music & More performances draw hundreds and its art gallery features serial exhibitions from established and breakthrough artists.

Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek—Hebrew for “House of Peace Pursuing Justice”—is marking the 100th year since the founding of one of its two predecessor temples in Moodus. We Built This House is part of yearlong centennial celebrations culminating in an Oct. 3 gala and the inaugural presentation of the synagogue’s new annual Pursuer of Peace and Justice Award. Though it is located in Chester, temple members come from 36 towns, from West Hartford to Westbrook, Norwich to North Branford.

Producer/director Joslow is a crisis/transition leader for private equity who spent a year mining the history of the congregation and its building. Given time limitations in the documentary, which was conceived as a pilot, the synagogue is developing a parallel video archive to capture stories of all congregants who were part of the building’s creation. Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is also positioning the film to encourage financial contributions to support “Second Century” programming. Supporters can be listed in permanent screen credits as producers.

DVDs of We Built This House are expected to be released later this year. Given the film’s unique insights into art as architecture, and into how a community can join together in creative enterprise, organizers anticipate interest among public television stations, those engaged in architectural and design collaborations, and art museums, in airing it following the premiere.

The Madison Art Cinemas is located at 761 Boston Post Road, Madison CT.

For more information on We Built This House or Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, see www.cbsrz.org or www.ancientandcool.com. Or contact Temple Administrator Wendy Bayor at wendy@cbsrz.net or 860-526-8920.

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Old Lyme Songwriter Lockwood Signs Exclusive Worldwide Publishing Agreement

Seated from left to right are Zach Lockwood and Chris Hunter, Pres. Old Gringo Music. Standing from left to right are Kenneth Wright, Pres. Dis Keef Music and Orville Almon, Jr.,ESQ., Almon & McPike, PLLC.

Seated from left to right are Zach Lockwood and Chris Hunter, Pres. Old Gringo Music. Standing from left to right are Kenneth Wright, Pres. Dis Keef Music and Orville Almon, Jr.,ESQ., Almon & McPike, PLLC.

Songwriter Zach Lockwood, who grew up in Old Lyme and graduated with the Lyme-Old Lyme High School Class of 2007, has signed an exclusive worldwide publishing agreement with Old Gringo/Dis Keef Music.

The 26-year-old has been involved in music his entire life. As a writer and performer since his teens, the Old Lyme native moved to Nashville, Tenn., three years ago and has been working and writing with some of Music City’s brightest talent.

Lockwood says,”Being able to write a song and have people be moved by it in some way is just the best feeling ever. I love being able to do what I do with friends and people who believe in me.”

Old Gringo’s President, Chris Hunter, commented, “It is such a pleasure to be able to work with a kid like Zach. He’s extremely talented as a writer and a player with a strong work ethic and desire to succeed. Music is his being and he continues to impress us on a daily basis.”

Dis Keef’s President, Kenneth Wright, adds, “Zach is a good guy and always brings something to the table. That counts with us.”

Lockwood is an ASCAP writer and will be represented by Old Gringo/ Dis Keef’s new “TEAMGOFORIT” company.

Lockwood’s parents are Dann and Kathleen Lockwood of Old Lyme.

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CT River Museum Offers Boat Building Workshop in July, Register By June 12

2.Ernstoff Shipyard – The Ernstoff Shipyard, a father and daughter team in 2014 work on their boat.

The Ernstoff Shipyard, a father and daughter team in 2014 work on their boat.

ESSEX — What floats your boat?

In celebration of the Connecticut River’s rich heritage, the Connecticut River Museum is once again offering the CRM 12, a slightly adapted Bevin’s Skiff kit that is produced in limited quantity. The 12′ skiff is reflective of the traditional boats that were built locally in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. With great versatility, these skiffs were used for fishing, rowing and sailing on the River and in the tidal marshes and tributaries. Simple and beautiful, the museum selected the CRM 12 as a good beginner project to build with the help of knowledgeable instructors.

The museum will offer a three-day Boat Building Workshop July 10 – 12. Participants can either do the workshop as individuals or as a group (up to four people). There is no previous boat building experience required to build one of these kits. However, organizers do expect that participants will have basic woodworking knowledge. By the end of the weekend, each individual or group should have a nearly completed boat that is ready for the water. As Ray Gaulke, museum board member and co-organizer stated, “It’s a marvelous way to learn basic boat building and have a product that you can take home.”

Last year’s successful program had four diverse teams — father/daughter, husband/wife, father/son and a Sea Scout troop — successfully build CRM 12’s. “It was a wonderful sight to see participants with little or no boatbuilding experience on Friday rowing their completed boats on the River Sunday afternoon”, said Chris Dobbs, museum executive director.

The CRM 12 kit comes complete with everything needed to build the boat — high-quality marine plywood, fastenings, adhesives, plans and an easy-to-follow manual. Boat builders only need to bring a few basic woodworking tools. The museum commissioned Paul Kessinger, a local wooden boat builder from Guilford, CT to build the first CRM 12 in 2014. Kessinger said that “This is a perfect activity for adults or families. Best yet, you will get years of enjoyment out of rowing or sailing your skiff.”

Space is extremely limited for the boat building workshop. Participants must be at least 10 years old and all children must be accompanied by an adult. The deadline to register is Friday, June 12. The $1,500 program fee ($1,400 for CRM members) includes all the supplies needed to build the CRM 12, oars, and instruction. By the end of the weekend, participants will have a completed boat, ready to be painted and rowed. For more information, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

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