September 4, 2015

Old Lyme Registrars Plan Lottery to Determine Order of Candidate’s Names on Election Ballot

The Old Lyme Registrars of Voters have announced they will hold a lottery to determine the horizontal order of candidates’ names for any office with a number of openings in the Nov. 3 municipal election.  The names will then appear in the order drawn within the appropriate row on the election ballot.

Candidates’ names will be drawn at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8, in the second floor Conference Room of Memorial Town Hall on Lyme St.  The public is welcome to attend.

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State Awards Old Lyme $2.05 Million to Rehab Rye Field Manor

On Wednesday, Aug. 26, the Department of Housing (DOH) announced that approximately $2.05 million will be awarded to the Town of Old Lyme in the form of a grant, and will be used to rehabilitate Rye Field Manor.

Rye Field Manor, which is located on Boston Post Rd., is a 39-unit development consisting of 13 buildings, plus a community building and is home to affordable elderly housing.

The funds come as part of the state’s efforts to expand access to affordable housing for low-income residents. Rehabilitation includes the replacement of the well water system, windows, insulation in crawl space and attic to minimize air infiltration, and the replacement of existing furnaces with energy-efficient units.

Devin_Carney-cropped_179

State Representative Devin Carney

These grants focus on the revitalization and expansion of affordable housing across the state said State Representative Devin Carney, who represents Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook. He noted, “I am pleased to see the state’s dedication to providing more housing options for seniors in the 23rd district.”

Carney continued, “As many seniors struggle to make ends meet, and there are fewer opportunities for new developments, rehabilitation efforts are key to ensuring that our senior population is taken care of. All seniors, regardless of income, deserve the opportunity to age-in-place and Rye Field Manor, with assistance from the state, is providing that opportunity.”

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Local Republican Legislators to Propose Elimination of Propane Tax

Rep. Devin Carney

State Representative Devin Carney

State Senator Paul Formica

State Senator Paul Formica

Local Republican state legislators Representative Devin Carney (R-23) and Senator Paul Formica (R-20) have announced that they will propose legislation to eliminate Connecticut’s gross receipts tax on propane.

“After the crazy weather we have experienced in recent years, many people bought generators.  They were trying to be proactive in case of another catastrophic event. Now, they are finding out that they are getting taxed for thinking ahead,” said Formica.

“This tax is unconscionable,” Carney said. “The government recommends smart storm preparedness, yet taxes home owners for doing just that. When the legislature meets next session, I intend to propose a bill to create a tax exemption for those using propane for all home and generator use, not just exclusively for heating. I hope my colleagues on the other side of the aisle will do what’s right for the people of Connecticut and support this proposal.”

The State of Connecticut assesses a tax on fuel delivered to a customer who uses a propane tank connected to a generator. This 8.81% tax is assessed on the delivery ticket, even if the propane also supplies an exempt heating use (such as home, pool, hot water, cooking, etc.).

Connecticut law says that in order to be exempt from this tax, the propane “must be used exclusively for heating purposes”. Because the propane to a generator produces electricity and not heat, this tax is assessed on deliveries to tanks which solely supply generators.

“People are frustrated and want some action.  I intend to bring this up in my capacity as the ranking member of the Energy and Technology Committee,” added Formica.

The 2016 session of the Connecticut General Assembly begins in February. The legislators said they would be pressing for a public hearing on the issue so that propane users can speak out about the tax.

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Democrats Stick With Reemsnyder, Nosal to Lead November Slate

Incumbents First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder (right) and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal have been endorsed by the Old Lyme Democrats to run again in November.

Incumbents First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder (right) and Selectwoman Mary Jo Nosal have been endorsed by the Old Lyme Democrats to run again in November.

Indicating that they are clearly comfortable with their current leadership, the Old Lyme Democratic town Committee (DTC)  last night endorsed incumbents Bonnie Reemsnyder and Mary Jo Nosal for First Selectwoman and Selectwoman respectively in the upcoming November election. The full slate of candidates, in fact, reflected a high level of satisfaction in the performance of those currently serving since the vast majority of endorsed positions were incumbents.

The only newcomers to the slate were Peter Hunt for the Region 18 Board of Education (incumbent Sarah Smalley is not running again) and Marissa Hartmann as an alternate for the zoning board of appeals.  Additionally, Ruth Dillon Roach is challenging Judith Tooker for the position of tax collector.

The remaining slate of incumbents includes David Woolley and Bennett Bernblum for the board of finance with Adam Burrows as an alternate.  Joseph Soucie was endorsed for Treasurer, Paul Fuchs and Michelle Roche for the board of education and Jane Cable for the zoning commission.  Finally, Karen Conniff and Kip Kotzan were endorsed for the zoning board of appeals.

In her endorsement acceptance speech, Nosal commented on the, “outstanding team of candidates,” noting its strength would enable the Democrats to, “continue to assert our message of collaboration, communication and community.”

She also noted that Reemsnyder, “is the right person, at the right time to continue as the CEO of our town … She has brought fair and balanced leadership to the office … She is respected in Hartford and the [Lower Connecticut] River Council of Governments.” Mentioning Reemsnyder’s ability to “get things done,” Nosal cited examples of Reemsnyder mending the “broken relationships” she inherited with the Town of Lyme and Region 18, and also Reemsnyder’s focus on customer service, which has been felt throughout Town Hall.

Nosal ended with a promise “to try and keep up with her as Selectwoman,” which sparked enthusiastic applause.

After the unanimous vote to endorse the full slate of candidates had been taken, Reemsnyder thanked the DTC for placing their confidence in her and said she found the endorsement, “humbling,” adding to rippled laughter, “Since taking office in 2011, we’ve been through a lot together.”  She mentioned Superstorm Sandy, the Sandy Hook tragedy, the Blizzard of 2013 and Winter Storm of 2015, but stressed that she does not spend much time looking back at her accomplishments because “I’m so embedded in what I’m doing.”

On her current “To Do” are completion of the boathouse/Hains Park project, implementing the Rte. 156/Hartford Ave. bikeway and improvements, and sorting out the Water Pollution Control Authority/sewer situation.  Reemsnyder commented that others may talk about fiscal conservatism but she prefers, “fiscal responsibility,” which requires planning ahead  for future needs and maintenance of current assets. She noted, “That’s what we’ve spent a lot of time doing.”

Finally Reemsnyder committed to “maintain my style,” of an open door policy, responsiveness, collaboration, and a willingness, “to continue to learn and listen.”

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Few Changes for Lyme Republican Slate in November Election

The Lyme Republican Town Committee has endorsed a slate of candidates for the November election comprised primarily of incumbents. The only changes are that current Region 18 Board of Education Chairman Jim Witkins is stepping down from that board and has been endorsed for the board of finance. Running in Witkins’s stead for the board of education is newcomer Mary Powell-St. Louis.

The remainder of the slate is made up of Linda Ward for tax collector; Linda Winzer for town clerk; William Hawthorne for treasurer;  David Tiffany for planning and zoning commission with Peter Evankow as an alternate; David Lahm for zoning board of appeals; and Jerry Ehlen and Holly Rubino for library directors.

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Area Legislators Applaud $7.5 Million Grant to Old Saybrook for Dredging North Cove

OLD SAYBROOK – Area legislators are applauding the State Bond Commission’s approval last Monday (May 11) of $7.5 million for the dredging of the North Cove, Connecticut River in Old Saybrook.

The funding, which comes from the state’s Grants-In-Aid program, will go toward improvements to ports and marinas, including dredging and navigational direction.

“This is a smart investment for our town,” Rep. Devin Carney (R-23) said. “Dredging the North Cove will keep property values up and protect our natural resources. I was pleased to work with local and state officials to secure this grant for Old Saybrook. This is great news.”

“This dredging project will create construction-related jobs while providing a lasting benefit to our region,” Sen. Art Linares, who represents part of Old Saybrook, said. “We are grateful to the governor and the bond commission for moving this project forward.”

“North Cove has been a port of call going back to the town’s early days,” Sen. Paul Formica, who represents part of Old Saybrook, said. “This project is really important. We need to make sure the ecological balance remains and that dredging allows for safe recreational boating.”

“This is a critical project for our town,” said Carl P. Fortuna, Jr., First Selectman of the Town of Old Saybrook. “The dredging last done in 2009 insufficiently opened up North Cove. This project will greatly add to the recreational usage of North Cove, as well as restoring it fully as a harbor of refuge in storms. We are thankful for the support of the Governor and the State Bond Commission.”

The North Cove in Old Saybrook is a part of the southern boundary of the Gateway Conservation Zone. The Gateway Conservation Zone boundary only extends 50 feet inland from the mean high water line. The proposed dredging of the North Cove would alleviate siltation issues due to reduced tidal flushing, which occurs when the openings to the river have been reduced by man-made structures. This also creates a problem for some deeper draft sailing vessels that moor at the North Cove.

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Senators Linares, Formica Tour CT River Museum

From left to right: Museum Executive Director Chris Dobbs, Museum Trustee Eileen Angelini, Sen. Linares, Museum Vice Chairman Joanne Masin, and Sen. Formica.

From left to right: Connecticut River Museum Executive Director Chris Dobbs, Museum Trustee Eileen Angelini, Sen. Linares, Museum Vice Chairman Joanne Masin, and Sen. Formica.

On March 9, area legislators toured the Connecticut River Museum on Main Street in historic Essex village. Senator Art Linares of Westbrook and Senator Paul Formica of East Lyme pledged to continue to raise public awareness of the museum at the State Capitol and throughout their senate districts.

For more information, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org .

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Linares Meets with AARP Volunteers to Discuss Issues Affecting Seniors

Gathered for a photo during Senator Linares's meeting with AARP volunteers are (from left to right) Barbara Rutigliano of Essex, Marian Speers of Old Saybrook, Sen. Art Linares, and Jean Caron of Old Saybrook.

Gathered for a photo during Senator Linares’s meeting with AARP volunteers are (from left to right) Barbara Rutigliano of Essex, Marian Speers of Old Saybrook, Sen. Art Linares, and Jean Caron of Old Saybrook.

Sen. Art Linares (R-33rd), whose District includes the Town of Lyme, met with Connecticut AARP volunteers at Essex Coffee and Tea Co. on Feb. 5, to discuss issues impacting seniors.

Linares urged seniors from throughout the region to contact him with any issues of concern.  He can be reached by phone at 800-842-1421 or email at Art.Linares@cga.ct.gov or on the web at www.senatorlinares.com.

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Carney Proposes Ban on Electronic Cigarette Use in Schools, on School Grounds

State Representative Devin Carney

State Representative Devin Carney

State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23) hopes to prohibit the use of electronic cigarettes on school grounds in his bill H.B. 5219.  Current regulation is limited to the use of electronic cigarettes by anyone under the age of 18; this legislation, however, would seek to expand upon the current bans to include prohibiting the use of electronic cigarettes on school grounds entirely. Schools already ban tobacco-based products, so this would add e-cigarettes to that ban.

“It’s critical that our schools be free from negative influences. Countless studies show that electronic cigarette use among high school and even middle school aged kids is rapidly rising. Not to mention that many kids who would have never tried a traditional cigarette are experimenting with e-cigarettes – especially flavored ones,” Carney said. “The bad habits brought on by them lead to the increased potential for addiction to nicotine-based products in the future.”

A recent Yale study notes that one in four Connecticut high school students have tried an e-cigarette. In addition, 26 percent of students who had reported to have never tried one were interested in trying one in the future.

Carney adds, “The availability of electronic cigarettes and ease at which they can be purchased by minors is a bit unsettling to me. We are fortunate to live in an area where many schools have already taken this initiative – a statewide ban on them on school property will strengthen those initiatives while also ensuring other schools, who may not have banned them yet, will have a ban in place.”

Carney has also proposed other bills including several proposals to lower taxes and increase the overall quality of life for the residents of the 23rd District.

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Former Governor Lowell Weicker Lauds President Obama’s New Openness to Cuba      

Former Connecticut Governor Lowell Weicker at his home in Old Lyme, Thursday.

Former Connecticut Governor Lowell Weicker at his home in Old Lyme, Thursday.

Lowell Weicker, a former Governor and Senator of Connecticut, has expressed his support for the Obama’s administration new policy of normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba. In taking this position, Weicker noted in an interview at his home in Old Lyme with ValleyNewsNow yesterday that current polls show that 60 percent of Americans support diplomatic recognition of Cuba.

In adopting a new U.S. relationship with Cuba, Weicker said, “Finally, we are catching up with the times.” He continued, “The U.S. embargo has lasted for 50 years, yet country after country has recognized Cuba with only the United States in not doing so.” Weicker also expressed criticism of those who oppose the Obama Administration new policy of recognizing Cuba, such as U.S. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida.

Positive Aspects of Today’s Cuba

According to Weicker, “The most positive aspects of the present Castro regime in Cuba are in the areas of health care and good public education. Ninety nine percent of Cubans have free health care and good public education, a complete turnaround from the days of Battista.” At the same time, Weicker faulted the present Cuban government, “for its lack of human rights and democratic elections.”

As for his personal relationship with Cuba, the former Connecticut Governor said, “My family owned a large business in Cuba, which was expropriated by the Castro government, after Battista fled the island. No one, especially myself, is going to extol Castro’s confiscation of private property.”

Weicker also noted his, “deep personal distaste for the dictatorship of Flugencio Battista, who preceded Fidel Castro. Early on,” he said, “most of the Cuban immigrants to the United States were allied with Battista. Indeed in my losing the 1988 Senate campaign, the Florida Cuban community poured late money into Senator Joe Lieberman’s campaign.”

Weicker’s Two Trips to Castro’s Cuba

Photo from the 1980s of then U.S. Senator Lowell Weicker shaking hands with Cuban dictator Fidel Castro.

Photo from the 1980s of then U.S. Senator Lowell Weicker shaking hands with Cuban dictator Fidel Castro.

Weicker also stated, “When I was a U.S. Senator, I made two trips to Cuba in the early 1980s. The first was to organize a joint American-Cuban marine science mission. The second was to secure the release of six American women imprisoned in Cuba.” According to Weicker, he, “convinced Castro, personally, to release the women who were in jail on drug charges. Two of the six were from Connecticut.”

Weicker described how, while in Cuba, he and Castro went diving together and spent many hours discussing Cuban-American relations. When Castro inquired whether there was anything he could do for Weicker, the Senator jokingly responded by requesting the Major League Baseball franchise for Havana. Castro’s response was, ‘No, we keep that.’”

In Weicker’s account, “When I announced to the Senate that I was to go to Cuba to retrieve the six women, U.S. Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina tried to block the trip.” Failing that endeavor, Helms asked Weicker, confidentially, if he could bring back some cigars for him.

Weicker also makes the point that the wrapper leaf for Cuban cigars are traditionally grown in Connecticut, so Connecticut would directly benefit from the lifting of U.S. restrictions on the importation of Cuban cigars.

In conclusion, Weicker said, “Cuban dictator Battista was bad news, and I agree that the Castro brothers have had their own failings.” However, Weicker does not want the U.S. to live in the past as regards Cuba. He states, “It is only a question of time … Cuba will become more and more democratic. It is a new world, and one that should see two old friends reconcile.”

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Southeastern Connecticut Delegation Highlights Transport Investment Needs in I-95 Corridor

Representative Aundre` Bumgardner, Senator Paul Formica, State Representative Devin Carney next to Governor Malloy at the Gold Star Bridge in New London for a transportation press conference.

Representative Aundre` Bumgardner, Senator Paul Formica, State Representative Devin Carney next to Governor Malloy at the Gold Star Bridge in New London for a transportation press conference.

Representative Aundre` Bumgardner, Senator Paul Formica, State Representative Devin Carney next to Governor Malloy at the Gold Star Bridge in New London for a transportation press conference.

Three freshman state lawmakers from Southeastern Connecticut joined Governor Malloy on Wednesday overlooking the Thames River to highlight the need for more investment in all modes of transportation along the I-95 corridor in the shoreline region.

“People in the southeast corridor of the state should have reliable and safe transportation systems. The fact that the Governor chose to highlight I-95 in our area is important. It is a major pathway for commerce in this region,” said Senator Paul Formica.

State Senator Formica (R) is the veteran lawmaker in the group of freshmen, recently resigning as the first selectman of East Lyme to serve as the 20th district’s state senator in Hartford.

“I have been working with the state department of Transportation for years as a first selectman to revamp exit 74 and to widen the Niantic River Bridge. Today’s event is an extension of those conversations,” added Formica.

Newly elected State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd) also reiterated the need to prioritize the upkeep of roads, bridges, rail and ports.

From left to right,  State Representative Aundre` Bumgardner, State Senator Paul Formica and State Representative Devin Carney stand next to the Gold Star Bridge in New London for a transportation press conference with CTDOT.

From left to right, State Representative Aundre` Bumgardner, State Senator Paul Formica and State Representative Devin Carney stand next to the Gold Star Bridge in New London for a transportation press conference with CTDOT.

“Improving our transportation infrastructure is very important to folks of Southeastern Connecticut. I applaud Governor Malloy for acknowledging that there needs to be upgrades made to I-95 at this end of the state. It’s a key area for commuters and tourists, so it’s crucial that traffic can move steadily and safely. As a member of the Transportation Committee, I will continue to be an advocate for government transparency and a proponent of public safety,” said Rep. Carney.

As one of the two youngest elected lawmakers in the country, Representative Aundre` Bumgardner brings a new perspective to the ongoing conversation of how to keep the state’s transportation infrastructure strong for future generations.

“Connecticut needs a comprehensive transportation plan that includes roads, bridges, rail, our ports and waterways and pedestrian-friendly ways to get around,” Rep. Bumgardner (R-41st) said. “I’m encouraged the Governor is making sure Southeastern Connecticut isn’t being left out but this is just the start. The Governor and the legislature must ensure any funding put into transportation projects is used specifically for transportation and protected from being raided for other purposes.”

All agree protecting the Special Transportation Fund may require new language for a “lock box” on funds collected through the gas tax, department of motor vehicle fees, as well as commuter train and bus tickets.

The event was held at the State DEEP Boat Launch on the New London side of the Thames River, just below the Gold Star Bridge. At 5,925 feet, the Gold Star is the longest bridge in Connecticut. The northbound bridge, which originally carried I-95 traffic in both directions, opened in 1943. A new bridge for southbound traffic opened in 1973.

Editor’s Note: State Senator Formica represents the 20th District towns of Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, East Lyme, Waterford, New London, Montville, Bozrah and Salem. State Representative Carney represents the 23rd District towns of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook. State Representative Bumgardner represents the 41st General Assembly District representing residents in Groton and New London

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Carney Assigned to Legislative Committees for 2015 Session

OLD SAYBROOK — State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd) will serve on three committees during the 2015 legislative session.

Carney has been assigned to the legislature’s committees on Environment, Transportation as well as Higher Education and Employment Advancement. His two-year term began Jan. 7.

“Carney will make an excellent addition to these committees, I am confident that he will serve the House Republican caucus with distinction,” said state Rep. Themis Klarides, incoming House Republican Leader. “Committee members serve as our eyes and ears when it comes to developing important legislation.”

Carney commented, “I look forward to representing the 23rd District on committees of such great importance as Environment, Transportation and Higher Education and Employment Advancement. The 23rd District is like no other with its scenic beauty and I want to ensure that both residents and tourists are able to enjoy it for generations to come. Transportation is a priority to many folks across the district and I will work extremely hard to try and repair our broken infrastructure.”

He continued, “Finally, I believe it’s time for my generation to step up and start taking the lead towards restoring our prosperity in an area that has affected it, higher education. Working to ensure we have a diverse, skilled workforce, aligned with available jobs, is part of the bigger picture of boosting our economy and preventing the further exodus of our youth.”

The Environment Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Environmental Protection, including conservation, recreation, pollution control, fisheries and game, state parks and forests, water resources, and all matters relating to the Department of Agriculture, including farming, dairy products and domestic animals.

The Transportation Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Transportation, including highways and bridges, navigation, aeronautics, mass transit and railroads; and to the State Traffic Commission and the Department of Motor Vehicles

The Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to (A) the Board of Regents for Higher Education and the Office of Higher Education, and (B) public and independent institutions of higher education, private occupational schools, post-secondary education, job training institutions and programs, apprenticeship training programs and adult job training programs offered to the public by any state agency or funded in whole or in part by the state.

“Committee rooms are where the laws of our state are outlined and where we can achieve the best for the people of the state of Connecticut,” Klarides said.

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Carney Sworn in, Prepares for First Term as State Representative

State Representative Devin Carney takes his place in the House on Opening Day of the new session.

State Representative Devin Carney takes his place in the House on Opening Day of the new session.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23) was sworn in today  as state representative for the 23rd General Assembly District covering Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.

Carney was among 19 other Republican freshmen who vowed to serve their districts over a two-year term. Carney states he is committed to reducing the expense of government and making our state a better place to live and do business in.

“I am eager to step into my new role as the voice in Hartford for the people of the 23rd District. There is much work to be done in order to bolster our economy and make Connecticut a more affordable and desirable place to live in and do business. I will focus on stimulating job growth, preventing burdensome unfunded mandates on the towns of the 23rd, and improving our transportation infrastructure. We must create a state that folks, particularly our youth, want to move to because we have opportunity, and one in which our seniors can afford to retire,” said Rep. Carney.

For the 2015-2017 legislative session, House Republican Leader Themis Klarides appointed Carney to serve on the Environment Committee, Transportation Committee and Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee.

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd)

State Representative Devin Carney     (R-23rd)

Rep. Carney took the oath of office and was sworn in by Secretary of State Denise Merrill on Wednesday afternoon in the State House Chamber. He then participated in a Joint Convention of both the House of Representatives and Senate as Gov. Dannel Malloy addressed lawmakers about the 2015 Session.

The Environment Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Environmental Protection, including conservation, recreation, pollution control, fisheries and game, state parks and forests, water resources, and all matters relating to the Department of Agriculture, including farming, dairy products and domestic animals.

The Transportation Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Transportation, including highways and bridges, navigation, aeronautics, mass transit and railroads; and to the State Traffic Commission and the Department of Motor Vehicles.

The Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to (A) the Board of Regents for Higher Education and the Office of Higher Education, and (B) public and independent institutions of higher education, private occupational schools, post-secondary education, job training institutions and programs, apprenticeship training programs and adult job training programs offered to the public by any state agency or funded in whole or in part by the state.

State Rep. Devin Carney represents the 23rd General Assembly District, which comprises the towns of  Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and the southern portion of Westbrook.

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Linares Denies Rumors of Challenge to Courtney in Next Election

State Senator (R) Art Linares

State Senator (R) Art Linares

“I have heard the rumors,” State Representative Phil Miller told ValleyNewsNow.com in a recent interview regarding State Senator Art Linares considering a challenge to Congressman Joe Courtney in the 2016 elections. Miller noted that the 2014 elections were tough for Democrats, citing the loss of 14 State Representative seats in the statehouse. Miller also commented that he, himself, had an uphill battle to survive the Republican sweep.

Linares’ spokesman, Adam Liegeot, said, “No,” however, when asked if Linares might challenge Courtney in the next Congressional race.

Linares’ numbers in the last election were impressive. He beat his Democratic challenger, Emily Bjornberg, 22,335 to 17,046, out of a total 39,932 votes cast. The percentages were: 56 percent for Linares and 43 percent for Bjornberg. Most impressive about Republican Linares’ victory was that he won what was once considered a safe Democratic district.

Congressman Joe Courtney (D)

Congressman Joe Courtney (D)

As for Courtney in the last election, he won his fifth term in office with landslide numbers against New London real estate agent Lori Hopkins-Cavanagh. Many considered the Congressman’s challenger weak, however, and state Republicans did not appear to mount a major effort to defeat Courtney.

The Republicans already control the House of Representatives, 234 Republicans to 201 Democrats. Some might argue that if Linares were to become a member of the House Majority, he would be in a better position to help his constituents than Minority member Courtney.

In the same interview, State Representative Phil Miller also commented on what he considered the negativity of candidate Bjornberg’s recent campaign against Linares. “People around here don’t like that,” Miller said. In contrast, however, it might be noted that the winning candidate for Governor, Dan Malloy, ran highly negative TV ads charging that his Republican opponent, Tom Foley, paid no taxes, and yet Malloy went on to win in what was, unquestionably, a tough year for the Democrats.

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Rep-Elect Carney Assigned to Legislative Committees

Headshot_247x283

Devin Carney

State Representative-elect Devin Carney will serve on three committees during the 2015 legislative session.

Carney has been assigned to the legislature’s committees on Environment, Transportation as well as Higher Education and Employment Advancement. His two-year term begins Jan. 7.

“Carney will make an excellent addition to these committees, I am confident that he will serve the House Republican caucus with distinction,” said state Rep. Themis Klarides, incoming House Republican Leader.  “Committee members serve as our eyes and ears when it comes to developing important legislation.”

Carney, who runs a small business, commented, “I look forward to representing the 23rd District on committees of such great importance as Environment, Transportation and Higher Education and Employment Advancement. The 23rd District is like no other with its scenic beauty and I want to ensure that both residents and tourists are able to enjoy it for generations to come. Transportation is a priority to many folks across the district and I will work extremely hard to try and repair our broken infrastructure.”

He added, “Finally, I believe it’s time for my generation to step up and start taking the lead towards restoring our prosperity in an area that has affected it, higher education. Working to ensure we have a diverse, skilled workforce, aligned with available jobs, is part of the bigger picture of boosting our economy and preventing the further exodus of our youth.”

The Environment Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Environmental Protection, including conservation, recreation, pollution control, fisheries and game, state parks and forests, water resources, and all matters relating to the Department of Agriculture, including farming, dairy products and domestic animals.

The Transportation Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to the Department of Transportation, including highways and bridges, navigation, aeronautics, mass transit and railroads; and to the State Traffic Commission and the Department of Motor Vehicles.

The Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee has cognizance of all matters relating to (A) the Board of Regents for Higher Education and the Office of Higher Education, and (B) public and independent institutions of higher education, private occupational schools, post-secondary education, job training institutions and programs, apprenticeship training programs and adult job training programs offered to the public by any state agency or funded in whole or in part by the state.

“Committee rooms are where the laws of our state are outlined and where we can achieve the best for the people of the state of Connecticut,” Klarides said.

 

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Courtney Comments on Obama Speech

Tonight, Congressman Joe Courtney (CT-2) released the following statement after President Obama’s speech outlining the planned implementation of the Immigration Accountability Executive Actions.

“It has been 511 days since the Senate passed a bipartisan immigration reform bill which would stabilize the broken immigration system, reduce the federal budget deficit, and—according to the Congressional Budget Office—grow the U.S. economy.”

“Despite calls by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the American Farm Bureau, and faith-based groups of all stripes, Speaker Boehner has refused for more than a year to allow even a debate on this measure, of which I am a cosponsor. The President’s temporary executive order adheres to past precedent regarding immigration, and should act as a spur to Congressional action – not further obstruction.”

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Op-Ed: Connecticut’s Publicly-Funded Campaign System Is A Joke

Suzanne Bates

Suzanne Bates

Here’s one last poll I’d like to see the numbers for — how many Connecticut residents woke up Wednesday morning excited about four more years of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy?

Unfortunately for Republican candidate Tom Foley, it appears voters chose the devil they know (or is it the porcupine?) instead of the devil they didn’t know …

Click here to read the full article by Suzanne Bates, which was published Nov. 6 on one of our partner news websites, CTNewsJunkie.com.

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Democrat Lomme Wins Second Term by 266 Votes for Nine-Town Judge of Probate

Judge of Probate Terrance Lomme wins second term.

Judge of Probate Terrance Lomme wins second term.

The contest for regional judge of probate was a replay of 2010, only closer, with Democratic Judge of Probate Terrance Lomme of Essex winning a second term over Republican challenger Anselmo Delia of Clinton.  The unofficial result was Lomme-12,895, Delia-12,635.

The results from the nine towns in the district, which include the Town of Lyme, were similar to the contest between Lomme and Delia in 2010, the year local probate courts were consolidated in to a regional probate court located in Old Saybrook.  Lomme carried Lyme, as well as those of Chester, Deep River, Essex, Lyme and Old Saybrook, while Delia carried the towns of Clinton, Haddam, Killingworth, and Westbrook.

Lomme won the 2010 race by 419 votes.  But Tuesday’s result was closer, with a 260-vote margin, after a campaign where Delia, a Clinton lawyer, questioned Lomme’s decision to retain some private legal clients while serving in the judge position that has an annual salary of $122,000.

The result for Lyme was Lomme-629, Delia-508; results for the other towns in the district were Chester:Lomme-985, Delia-544, Clinton: Lomme 2,069, Delia-2,755, Deep River: Lomme-1,060, Delie-761, Essex: Lomme-1,740, Delia-1,295, Haddam: Lomme-1,649, Delia-1,855, Killingworth: Lomme-1,291, Delia-1,440, Old Saybrook: Lomme-2,279, Delia-2,109, and Westbrook: Lomme 1,193, Delia-1,368.

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Linares Defeats Bjornberg, Winning 10 of 12 Towns in 33rd District

State Senator Art Linares

State Senator Art Linares

Republican State Senator Art Linares of Westbrook was re-elected to a second term Tuesday, defeating Democratic challenger Emily Bjornberg of Lyme by a decisive margin and carrying 10 of the 12 district towns.

Unofficial results showed Linares with 22,170 votes to 16,922 votes for Bjornberg. Green Party nominee Colin Bennett of Westbrook garnered about 150 votes. Bjornberg carried her hometown of Lyme, 636-539, and Chester, 829-708. But Linares carried the other ten towns by decisive margins, with the closest result in Deep River, Linares, 975, Bjornberg 897.  The result in Essex was Linares 1,647 to Bjornberg 1,504. Linares also carried the district towns of Clinton, Colchester, East Haddam, East Hampton, Haddam, Portland, Westbrook, and Old Saybrook.

Bjornberg received the results while gathered with family members and supporters at the Democratic headquarters in Deep River. Bjornberg said she called Linares to concede when the result became clear around 9:20 p.m. “It was a good race but it was a tough year for Democrats in eastern Connecticut,” she said.

Linares appeared around 9:50 p.m. before a crowd of about 100 cheering supporters gathered in the ballroom at the Water’s Edge Resort in Westbrook., declaring that his victory, along with wins in state House races by Republicans Devin Carney in the 23rd District and Jesse McCLachlin in the 35th district represented “a new generation of leadership.”

Linares also alluded to the sometimes harsh contest with Bjornberg. “We were attacked over and over again, but the decent people of this district knew better,” he said.  Linares, 26, also praised his 24-year-old brother Ryan Linares, who served as campaign manager. “He was the only campaign manager who actually lived with the candidate,” Linares said.

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Courtney, Carney, Formica, Linares All Win – Malloy, Foley Too Close to Call

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Devin Carney

There were “tons and tons and tons” of voters at the Cross Ln. Polling Station in Old Lyme today according to one election worker, who said voting was brisk all day.  Quite a number of politicians, journalists, campaign workers, and supporters then gathered at 8 p.m. to hear the results, but they were not announced until significantly after the polls closed due to some procedural challenges.

Voting for the Governor reflects the state result in that it is still too close to call, but, Joe Courtney netted a convincing win in the US Second Congressional District. In the House 23rd District, Democrat Mary Stone conceded to Republican Devin Carney saying, ” The voters have spoken and now it’s up to all of us to help Devin do the best job he can.”  Art Linares (R) held onto his 33rd State Senate seat defeating a strong challenge from rookie Emily Bjornberg (D), while Paul Formica (R) cruised past Betsy Ritter (D) to take the 20th State Senate seat vacated by Andrea Stillman.

Old Lyme’s unconfirmed results are given below:

Governor:
Dannel Malloy (D) 1,746
Thomas C. Foley (R) 1,752

Comptroller:
Kevin Lembo (D) 1,712
Sharon McLaughlin (R) 1,624

Attorney General:
George Jepsen (D) 2,719
Kie Westby (D) 1,444

Secretary of State:
Denise Merrill (D) 1,715
Peter Lumaj (R) 1,643
Michael DeRosa (Grn) 57

Treasurer:
Denise Nappier (D) 1,665
Tim Herbst (R) 1,767

US House District 2:
Joe Courtney (D) 2,153
Lori Hopkins-Cavanagh (R) 1,337
William Clyde (Grn) 24
Daniel Reale (Lib) 20

State Assembly 23rd District: 
Devin R. Carney (R) 1,874
Mary Stone (D) 1,593

Additional candidates on the Old Lyme ballot are:

State Senate 20th District:
Elizabeth B. Ritter (D) 1,453
Paul Formica (R) 2,139

Additional candidates on the  Lyme ballot are:

State Senate 33rd District:
Art Linares (R)
Emily Bjornberg (D)

 

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