July 1, 2015

Sound View Hosts Independence Day Parade Saturday

Leading last year's parade was this cheerful flag-bearer.

Last year’s parade was led by this cheerful flag-bearer.

The Sound View Beach Association (SVBA) hosts its traditional Independence Day parade this coming Saturday, July 4, starting at 10 a.m. from the Shoreline Community Center on Hartford Ave.  in Old Lyme. Described as a true “home town” community parade, children, adults, and civic groups are invited to march or spectate and enjoy this special experience.

The organizers suggest residents should decorate their bikes and wagons, build a float, or wear a patriotic costume.   Pets are also welcome to march.  There will be a VFW Honor Guard, child marchers, decorated bikes, floats, balloons, a marching band, police, fire and ambulance trucks, which will all contribute to a unique, small town experience.

Awards are given in categories such as best-decorated bike, most patriotic outfit, best float, and best-dressed pet. Assembly time for the parade is 9:45 a.m. at the Shoreline Community Center and step-off is 10 a.m.  The parade route includes Hartford, Swan, and Portland Avenues.

Entries in the Parade must be in good taste and in conformance with the Mission and family atmosphere of the SVBA. The decision of the board of directors is final. The SVBA is an all volunteer, non-profit, civic organization.  It owns and manages the Shoreline Community Center and also provides the flags in the Sound View area.

Everyone is invited to join or help. Frank Pappalardo, who is the chair of the SVBA, says, “We’re always accepting new members, volunteers and donations.  All donations are tax deductible and we are registered for “matching gift” grants with many companies.

For more information, email info@soundviewbeach.com or visit www.soundviewbeach.com

Share

Independence Day Weekend Openings, Closings in Old Lyme

Old Lyme Town Hall offices will be closed on Friday, July 3.

The Old Lyme Transfer Station will be open on Friday, July 3, and closed on Saturday, July 4.

There is no change to the trash or recycling pick up schedule in the Town of Old Lyme on Friday, July 3.

Share

Sound View Improvements, Rte. 156 Bike Way Info Meeting to be Held Tonight in Old Lyme

A Public Informational Meeting for the Rte. 156 Bike Way and Sound View Improvements Project is scheduled for this evening, Tuesday, June 30 at 7 p.m. in the Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School auditorium.

 

Share

Legal News You Can Use: Man’s Best Friend (?) and the Law

Dog with LeashThe state of Connecticut is very strict about the keeping of dogs.  In addition to requiring all dogs to be licensed and leashed, Connecticut has what is known as strict liability as to injury that may be caused by man’s best friend.  Section 22-357 of the Statutes provides:

“If any dog does any damage to either the body or property of any person, the owner or keeper … shall be liable for such damage except when such damage has been occasioned to the body or property of a person … who was committing a trespass or other tort or when the person was teasing, tormenting or abusing such dog.”

So, the law specifies that the dog has the right to defend its owner’s property against a trespasser and no one has the right to abuse a dog.  This is called Strict Liability, because if a dog causes harm, the victim does not have to prove that the dog was of “known vicious propensities” as is required in some states.  Or as it is known in those states, “the dog is entitled to its first bite.”

Connecticut’s Strict Liability law only applies to the owner or keeper of the dog.  However, victims of dog bites are not limited to the owner or keeper of the dog.  If the victim can show another person, e.g., a landlord, was aware of a known vicious dog kept by his tenant, the landlord could be held personally responsible, similar to the other states described above.  This is called the common law.

Insurance

Homeowner’s insurance has traditionally provided coverage for injuries caused by the owner’s dog.  However, with the growing popularity of special breed dogs, e.g., Pit Bulls, Rottweilers, Akitas, etc. more insurance companies are excluding such breeds from coverage or excluding all dogs completely.

Apartment dwellers can also obtain tenant’s insurance with the possibility of exclusions as in homeowner’s insurance.  Of course, where these are such exclusions, special endorsements to include dogs can be obtained, for an extra premium, of course.

Damages

The usual cases we see arise from dog bites which can be quite serious.  Risk of infection, even rabies is always a possibility – therefore any dog bite should be reported to the dog warden/animal control officer/police so the dog can be quarantined for the proper length of time.  Medical attention should be sought immediately, especially if the skin is broken.

Next the identity of the dog and its owner should be obtained – from its license and/or the Town Clerk.

Any witnesses should be identified and contact information be obtained.

Next, any injury should be photographed.  Frequently, we employ a professional photographer because scarring and disfigurement are difficult to portray accurately and realistically.

Cosmetic surgery may be required or recommended.  This may be problematic for children as surgery may have to wait until their teens.  Meanwhile, children must live with scars and disfigurement, which can be psychologically traumatizing.

There will be medical bills, which, if paid for by health care insurance, may have to be reimbursed.  Future medical costs also may have to be considered.

So although a dog may be man’s best friend, it’s usually your own dog, not the other guy’s dog.

Editor’s Notes: i) Attorney Matthew Shafner is a Director at Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law in New London, and a nationally recognized lawyer in the fields of personal injury, asbestos injury, maritime injury and workers compensation law. Contact him at mshafner@sswbgg.com or (860) 442-4416.
ii) Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law is the largest law firm in eastern Connecticut, serving the community for over 75 years with a wide range of legal services.  For more information, visit suismanshapiro.com or call 860-460-0875.  Suisman Shapiro is located a 2 Union Plaza, P.O. Box 1591, New London, CT  06320.

Share

White Elephant Sale Intake Continues Today

And they're off!  The annual White Elephant Sale starts each year on the first strike of 9 a.m. on the designated Friday.

And they’re off! The annual White Elephant Sale starts each year on the first strike of 9 a.m. on the designated Friday.

WES-sticker-onlyIt’s once again time to start preparing for one of the biggest rummage sales in all of New England — the White Elephant Sale [WES] sponsored by the Ladies Benevolent Society of the First Congregational Church, which will take place this year at the church on Friday, July 10, and Saturday, July 11.

This popular sale raises money for missions and good works both locally and through out the world.  Some of the beneficiaries include food pantries, health organizations, family support centers, children’s programs, world relief, housing, along with many many more.

Donations are needed.  Look around in the attic for those treasures and bring them to the church starting Thursday, June 25, for eight days through Friday, July 3 [closed Sunday, June 28, and Saturday, July 4.]  Quality items will be accepted from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day and on Thursday, June 25, Tuesday, June 30 and Thursday, July 2, there will be additional evening donation periods from 6 to 8 p.m.

Click this link for a full White Elephant Sale calendar and a list of donations that are (and are not) acceptable. 

For those new to the town or those who have never taken part, this is the 79th successive year and is one of the main events on both the town and church calendars.  Everyone has seen garage and rummage sales but few can match the size and color of this one.

The sale items are organized into more than 20 departments that fill the church buildings and every available space on the lawn.  It has grown so large, it has become a true “community event” as many of the donations and a number of volunteer workers are non-church members.  Many people plan their vacations or family visits to Old Lyme so as to attend or work at the WES.

Some 200+ volunteers pitch in for two weeks collecting, sorting, pricing and organizing items for the big day — Friday morning when the crowds anxiously gather outside the ropes surrounding the church grounds.  When the bell tower clock strikes 9 a.m., the ropes come down and the shoppers run for their favorite departments looking for those bargains.

And if that isn’t enough — there is lunch and soda to refresh the shoppers so they can repeat the same process again on Saturday morning when the prices are discounted by 50 percent.  Check out the pictures on the church website and a Youtube video link of a previous sale.

To donate or to volunteer, call the church office at 860-434-8686.

Share

Lymes’ Senior Center Hosts Art & Nature Weekend; Pooch Parade at 11am Today

A class on container gardening will be held

A container gardening class will be held on Saturday, June 27.

This weekend, June 26, 27 and 28, Lymes’ Senior Center will host its 2nd Annual Art and Nature Weekend.  Join in the festivities of this special weekend celebrating the beauty of the local surroundings and the many talents of the citizens of Lyme and Old Lyme.

During the weekend, the Lymes’ Senior Center will be filled with the art work of its Shoreline Artists’ Workshop.  Original paintings, prints, and greeting cards will be for sale with a portion of sales going to the Senior Center.

Friday will see a Grand Opening to the event starting at 5 p.m. and on Saturday, there will be a hike, numerous painting and art-themed events, a visit by ponies from High Hopes and a container gardening class.  On Sunday, there will be another hike in a different location, an Independence Day-themed Pooch Parade and a “Critter Encounter.”  These are just a selection of the weekend’s events.

Most events will take place at Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme, CT.  Call (860)434-1605 ext 240 with any questions.

Today’s schedule is as follows:

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 28

Banningwood Preserve

Banningwood Preserve

Family Hike of Banningwood Preserve
9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

This hike will be led by Wendy Hill, Lyme Land Trust Director and Open Space Coordinator. It is open to all ages.  Following the hike, all are welcome back at the Senior Center to view paintings created recently by local artists in a Banningwood Paint-Out.

For more information, or to register for this, call (860)434-1605 ext. 240

Blooming Art Exhibit
10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  
Lymes’ Senior Center 
This is free and open to the public. This exhibit features carefully selected paintings from the Shoreline Artists Workshop and Floral Designs inspired by them arranged by members of both the Duck River Garden Club and the Lyme Garden Club.  In addition, the winning photos from the 9th Annual Land Trusts Photo Contest will be on display.

Pooch Parade
11:30 a.m.
Lymes’ Senior Center 

Pooch Parade
Dogs sporting an Independence Day theme will be eligible to win a “poochie” prize.  Gift certificates have been donated by Olivers Tails in Old Lyme and The Feed Bag in Old Saybrook.  A picture of your pooch will also be featured in our upcoming newsletter. Open to all ages.
To register your pooch, call (860)434-1605 ext. 240.

grey-treefrog500“Critter Encounter”
1 p.m.
Lymes’ Senior Center
This will be a live animal show presented by the Pequot Nature Center showcasing the gray tree frog, bull frog, painted and box turtles, snakes, and an owl. Open to all ages.
For more information, or to register, call (860)434-1605 ext. 240.

 

Share

Lymestock 2015: MusicNow Presents All-Day Youth Concert at Ashlawn Farm Today

Award-winning band 'Playing With Fire 3' will play at Lymestock 2015 on Sunday at Ashlawn Farm.

Award-winning band ‘Playing With Fire 3′ will play at Lymestock 2015 on Sunday at Ashlawn Farm.

The MusicNow Foundation is sponsoring a youth concert at Ashlawn Farm, 78 Bill Hill Rd. in Lyme on Sunday, June 28, from 12 to 6:30 p.m.  The event will feature a selection of New England’s award-winning young artists.

Performers include the Hilton Park Band, Kala Farnham, PJ Tautkus, Julia Russo, Playing With Fire 3, Jake Kulak, Juice, Terri Guddis and The Advantagers, Drew Cathcart, Sophia Griswold, Christine Salazar and  Meredith Kegley.

There will also be games, crafts, door prizes and more.  Picnics will be available from Bliss Gourmet BBQ.  Bring your own blankets.

Partners and friends supporting the event include Ashlawn Farm, Bliss Gourmet, Nightingale’s Acoustic cafe, Gramma’s Attic promotions, WCNI Radio, Pavoh.org and Great Blue Research, Inc.

The MusicNow Foundation, Inc., is dedicated to the support of live music to engage, enrich and educate young artists through workshop programming, performance opportunities and musical mentorships nurturing creative and artistic growth.

For further information, call (860) 434-1961  or email info@musicnowfoundation.org
Nightingales’s Café & Coffeehouse at 68 Lyme St. in Old Lyme is a gathering place for live, local and homegrown music.  Friday Nite Live Coffeehouses are for the best in youth artists while Sweet Saturday Nites feature regional and national artists.
Share

Summer Fun Opportunities for Youth at High Hopes

High Hopes in Old Lyme has a few openings remaining in some of its fun, horse-related programs for youth this summer as follows:

Community Riding Lessons

Sign up for Group Youth Lessons (three per group) at High Hopes in Old Lyme on Fridays from 3 to 4 p.m. through Aug. 7 or Teen/Adult Semi Private Lessons (two per group) at Camp Harkness, Waterford on Wednesdays from 1 to 1:45 p.m. or 2 to 2:45 p.m. through Aug. 5.

Contact Courtney Bernard at 860-434-1974, ext. 118 to learn more or visit www.highhopestr.org.

Summer Camp

There are a few spots left this July in the High Hopes Summer Camp for all children ages 3 to 12 on their beautiful 125-acre campus in Old Lyme, Conn.  Campers are provided opportunities to build and/or develop horsemanship skills both on and off the horse.

Campers will groom and tack their horse each morning in addition to a daily riding lesson. Other activities include vaulting, carriage driving, inclusive team building games and equine arts and crafts.

Contact Sarah Carlson at 860-434-1974, ext. 115 to learn more or visit www.highhopestr.org.

Share

Local Authors Release New Book, Speak About “Remarkable Women of Old Lyme,” Aug. 24

Michaelle Pearson and Fred Lampos will host a book signing for their book, "Remarkable Women of Old Lyme," on Saturday in Old Lyme.

Michaelle Pearson and Jim Lampos will host a book signing for their book, “Remarkable Women of Old Lyme,” on Saturday in Old Lyme. Photo by Angela Chicoski Photography.

Jim Lampos and Michaelle Pearson have recently released a new book, Remarkable Women of Old Lyme, published by History Press. The book features stories of Old Lyme women including Phoebe Griffin Noyes, Evelyn MacCurdy Salisbury, Florence Griswold and Katharine Ludington.

Book coverThe authors will speak about these and other Remarkable Women of Old Lyme at local venues throughout the summer, including a presentation at the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library on Monday, Aug. 24, at 7 p.m.

The husband and wife team previously co-authored Rumrunners, Governors Beachcombers and Socialists —A History of Old Lyme Beaches, which was published by the Old Lyme Historical Society in 2010.

Remarkable Women of Old Lyme is available for sale at all author events, at many local shops including the Florence Griswold Museum Shop, the Carousel Shop, the Women’s Exchange, and also online at amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com andbooksamillion.com.

Editor’s Note: ‘Remarkable Women of Old Lyme’ by Jim Lampos and Michaelle Pearson is published by History Press 2015 with a cover price is $21.99.

Share

Old Lyme Town Band Gives Sound View Concert This Evening

The Old Lyme Town Band

The Old Lyme Town Band

The Town of Old Lyme and the Sound View Commission are sponsoring family-friendly concerts at Sound View Beach this summer.

The first concert  of the 2015 series will be held tonight, Thursday, June 25, and feature the Old Lyme Town Band.  The free outdoor concerts will take place from 7 through 8.30 p.m., near the flag pole at the end of Hartford Avenue at Sound View Beach.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair, and settle in for a lovely evening of sunset music.  Everyone is welcome to attend these family-friendly events.

There is no rain location for this concert.  Should a weather cancellation be necessary it will be posted on LymeLine.com and the Town website under “News & Announcements.”

The original Old Lyme Town Band existed from 1886 to 1910. The band members practiced in the “Band Room,” a building on the corner of Shore and Ferry Roads that has since been converted to a residence.

In the summer of 1975, Michele Smith Dickey, a granddaughter of one of the original band members, re-formed the band in anticipation of the US bicentennial celebration. Dickey took lessons on a trombone which reputedly belonged to a member of the original Old Lyme Town Band. Donald Janse, then director of cadet musical activities at the US Coast Guard Academy and past director of the Coast Guard Band, was the first conductor of the modern band.

Since 1975, the band, whose members represent many area towns, has presented concerts from Guilford to Mystic, and from Old Lyme to Middletown, particularly during the summer.

Rehearsals are held Monday evenings from 7  to 9 p.m. at Christ the King Church in Old Lyme. New members of all ages are welcome with no auditions.

For further information, contact the band at this link.

Share

Old Lyme Town Band Gives Sound View Concert Tomorrow Evening

The Old Lyme Town Band

The Old Lyme Town Band

The Town of Old Lyme and the Sound View Commission are sponsoring family-friendly concerts at Sound View Beach this summer.

The first concert  of the 2015 series will be held tomorrow, Thursday, June 25, and will feature the Old Lyme Town Band.  The free outdoor concerts will take place from 7 through 8.30 p.m., near the flag pole at the end of Hartford Avenue at Sound View Beach.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair, and settle in for a lovely evening of sunset music.  Everyone is welcome to attend these family-friendly events.

There is no rain location for this concert.  Should a weather cancellation be necessary it will be posted on LymeLine.com and the Town website under “News & Announcements.”

The original Old Lyme Town Band existed from 1886 to 1910. The band members practiced in the “Band Room,” a building on the corner of Shore and Ferry Roads that has since been converted to a residence.

In the summer of 1975, Michele Smith Dickey, a granddaughter of one of the original band members, re-formed the band in anticipation of the US bicentennial celebration. Dickey took lessons on a trombone which reputedly belonged to a member of the original Old Lyme Town Band. Donald Janse, then director of cadet musical activities at the US Coast Guard Academy and past director of the Coast Guard Band, was the first conductor of the modern band.

Since 1975, the band, whose members represent many area towns, has presented concerts from Guilford to Mystic, and from Old Lyme to Middletown, particularly during the summer.
Rehearsals are held Monday evenings from 7  to 9 p.m. at Christ the King Church in Old Lyme. New members of all ages are welcome with no auditions. For further information, contact the band at this link.
Share

Old Lyme Youth Program Featured at Washington DC Juvenile Justice Conference

From left to right, Missy Garvin, Youth Programs Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau,  Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors Julia Strycharz and Taylor Hamparian, and Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane at the annual conference of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington, DC.

From left to right, Missy Garvin, Youth Programs Coordinator at Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau, stands with Lyme-Old Lyme High School seniors Julia Strycharz and Taylor Hamparian, and Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane at the annual conference of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington, DC.

On June 11, members of the Old Lyme Youth and Police group known as ‘Cop Club’ highlighted their four-year-old program at the Coalition for Juvenile Justice 2015 Annual Conference in Washington DC.

Old Lyme Police Officer Martin Lane and Lyme-Old Lyme High School (LOLHS) senior Julia Strycharz were panelists during the presentation titled, “Increasing Positive Relations between Police and Youth.”  This presentation was included in the conference’s Welcome and General Session, which highlighted the importance of positive relations between police and young people.

Lane and Strycharz described the local efforts in Connecticut that bring law enforcement and youth together around jointly planned projects.

A collaborative project between the Old Lyme Police and the Lyme’s Youth Service Bureau (LYSB), was awarded $10,000 in grants administered by the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee in 2011, 2012 and 2013 to establish a youth and police program.  The youth programs are required to provide leadership roles for the youth and non-authoritarian roles for police officers.

Julia Strycharz presents at the conference.

Julia Strycharz presents at the conference.

 

Initially called ‘Operation LOL,’ LOLHS students and police collaborated in the writing of the grant.  The program has a goal of creating opportunities for youth and police to get to know each other through a series of monthly planned activities. These activities promote positive youth development, strengthen relationships between youth and police, and also help the community through a group service project.

Since being awarded the grant, youth and police have jointly planned fun monthly activities, including trips to New York City, Mount Monadnock,  a trampoline park, go-kart racing, snow tubing, bowling and an annual table tennis tournament held at LYSB.  Officer Lane said “Nothing builds friendships better than sharing ice cream together after getting beaten by the youth in a game of ping pong.”

Over 60 Lyme and Old Lyme youth have participated in ‘Cop Club’ since its inception.  The Connecticut Youth and Police grant permitted a maximum of three years funding for any one program.  Due to this, in 2014 the Town of Old Lyme decided to continue their commitment and fund this successful program.  The Old Lyme Police Union has also contributed monthly to ‘Cop Club’ for the past four years.

One of the requirements for Old Lyme Police Officers to participate in “Cop Club” was to attend a mandatory training in ‘Effective Police Interaction with Youth.’  This training provides patrol officers with information to understand youth behaviors better and provides practical strategies for interaction with young people in positive ways.

Officer Lane (left) and Julia Strycharz (right) were participants in a panel discussion at the 2015 Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington DC.

Officer Lane (left) and Julia Strycharz (right) were participants in a panel discussion at the 2015 Coalition for Juvenile Justice in Washington DC.

 

From this training, officers became better equipped to communicate effectively with young people they encountered and increased the likelihood that interactions with youth would result in positive outcomes.  Old Lyme Police Officers learned about the problem of inequitable treatment of minority and white youth in the juvenile justice system.

They discussed approaches for collaborating with youth officers and identified the benefits of taking a more supportive approach to dealing with youth.   Eventually, two thirds of the Old Lyme Police received this training and actively participated in the youth and police program.

In his remarks Officer Lane added, “Within my first year in Old Lyme, I realized that the Old Lyme Police Department had little to no involvement with the community’s youth and I began to develop this program with LYSB.  As for the experience being rewarding, the transformation of attitudes toward youth by police officers, who had previously little contact with this age group, was immediately visible.”

Getting to know other conference delegates over meals was an especially enjoyable part of the conference.

Getting to know other conference delegates over meals was an especially enjoyable part of the conference.

Strycharz commented, “I was a little nervous to be speaking to an audience of 300 people, mostly juvenile justice professionals.  I told them how our relationships and friendships are invaluable. Not only did the youth develop a new-found-opinion of the policemen of this town, but as the word spread about the club, the new attitude about the policemen also spread too.”

She continued, “The ‘Cop Club’ has changed the culture school-wide.  The youth of our town are not afraid of the policemen anymore. If they happen to be in the school, or at a sporting event, students aren’t afraid to approach them and say hello, ask them a question, or casually talk to them.”

Group_photo_DC_v2

Joining Lane and Strycharz at the conference were LYSB Programs Coordinator Missy Garvin and LOLHS senior Taylor Hamparian.    Garvin said “We are very proud of the success of our program in Old Lyme and it’s an honor for us to be highlighted at this national juvenile justice conference in Washington.  LYSB and the Old Lyme Police have created a valuable partnership, which will benefit both our youth and the police in our town for years to come.”

She added enthusiastically, “I can’t wait to start planning our next group to start in the fall.”

 

Share

CT Early Music Festival Concludes Tonight with Bach Program in New London

CT Early Music FestivalMusic and drama have been linked since Antiquity, when Greek drama evolved from choruses that recited poetry. This year’s Connecticut Early Music Festival program explores music’s relationship to the theatrical modes of tragedy and comedy. From the music of the commedia dell’arte to dramatic and comic moments in Beethoven’s violin sonatas, this year’s concerts demonstrate works of music as works of theater.

The festival offers three pairs of concerts over the first three weekends in June.  The Saturday, June 20 concert is at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme and the Sunday, June 14 concert is at the La Grua Center in Stonington; all the remaining concerts are at Evans Hall in Connecticut College.

Tickets can be ordered online at this link.

The program for the final weekend concerts is as follows:

Week Three

The Baltimore Consort
MUSICK’S SILVER SOUND: HEAVENLY
HARMONY AND EARTHLY DELIGHT
IN THE BRITISH ISLES, FRANCE, AND SPAIN
Saturday, June 20 – 7:30 p.m.
First Congregational Church of Old Lyme

The Baltimore Consort has delighted audiences on both sides of the Atlantic for 35 years. Its mixed ensemble of viols, recorders, plucked-string instruments, and voice could be called “Shakespeare’s Stage Band.” In this spirit, the ensemble performs existing and new arrangements of tunes popular in Shakespeare’s time from England and Continental Europe.

Connecticut Early Music Ensemble
TRAGEDY AND COMEDY IN BACH’S CANTATAS
Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen (BWV 12) and
Hercules auf dem Scheidewege (BWV 213)
Sunday, June 21 – 5 p.m.
Evans Hall, Connecticut College, New London
Pre-Concert talk by Dr. Eric Rice – 4 p.m.
All are welcome to attend a reception after the performance

These two cantatas by J.S. Bach both contain ravishing music that the composer saw fit to use in later compositions: BWV 12, a meditation on the afflictions Christians have to endure, became the Crucifixus of the Mass in B Minor, and BWV 213, a dramma per musica written for the birthday of the crown prince of Saxony, was recast as part of the Christmas Oratorio.

Share

Child & Family Hosts Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour Today

This beautiful Joshua Bliss garden is on the 2015 Garden Tour.

This beautiful Joshua Bliss garden is on the 2015 Garden Tour.

Advance tickets are now available for the 2015 Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour, taking place on Friday, June 19, and Saturday, June 20. Just in time for the start of summer, the Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour brings together six carefully chosen destinations in Lyme, all within minutes of each other.

At the 2015 Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour you can:

  • stroll through the grounds of a master gardener’s home and learn how she practices sustainable gardening; also, marvel at a garden space that was created around a granite outcropping
  • delight in the gardens of an acclaimed interior designer—and get a sneak peek at her remarkable kitchen
  • be awed by the extent and variety of rare plant specimens on display at a botanist’s home, and tour his heated conservatory
  • breathe in the calm at a former turkey farm that features a new post-and-beam barn and now hosts cows and chickens
  • bask in the elegance of an English garden that overlooks the Eight Mile River.

Each of the gardens on the 2015 Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour offers a unique perspective on gardening along the shoreline in Connecticut, and together they provide a fitting welcome to a long-awaited summer!

Greyrock3_LR

Another beautiful garden on the 2015 Tour.

The popular Garden Talks return, included in the price of admission.  This year, garden experts will present talks on such topics as The Importance of Soil, Natural Habitat Gardening, and Gardening FAQs. Lunches, catered by Saybrook Catering Co., will be available on both days, and the ever-popular Garden Boutique will offer gifts and furnishings for garden, home, and you!

The Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour takes place (rain or shine) on Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20. The self-guided tour runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p..m both days, and visitors should allow at least three hours to complete.

Advance tickets for this year’s Garden Tour ($25 advance, $30 day of tour) are available locally through June 17 at The Bowerbird and Old Lyme Landscape in Old Lyme; Hadlyme Country Market in Hadlyme; and Pough Interiors in Essex.  Tickets can also be purchased at the Child & Family Agency offices at 255 Hempstead Street, New London, or by sending a check and SASE to P.O. Box 324, Old Lyme, CT  06371. Online sales are available at www.childandfamilyagency.org.

All proceeds from the 2015 Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour will benefit the many services and capital projects of the Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to the well-being and development of all children and their families, with emphasis on the unmet needs of children lacking physical, emotional, and intellectual care and nurturing. With offices in New London, Essex, and Groton, Child & Family Agency is the largest nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut.

For more information, see www.childandfamilyagency.org.

Share

Death of Old Lyme Author, Caldecott Medal Winner Judith St.George Announced

Caldecott Medal winning book by Judith St. George, "So You Want to Be President"

Caldecott Medal winning book by Judith St. George, “So You Want to Be President”

Long-time Old Lyme resident Judith St. George, 84, died on June 10, 2015 in Bloomfield, Conn.  She was the author of more than 40 books, including several young adult mysteries as well as award-winning nonfiction books for younger readers.

Among her many accolades, “So You Want to Be President?” won the Caldecott Medal, “The Mount Rushmore Story” won the Christopher Award, “The Brooklyn Bridge: They Said It Couldn?t Be Done” won the New York Academy of Sciences Award, and “The Panama Canal: Gateway to the World” won the Golden Kite Award.

Her obituary was published June 14 in The New York Times at this link.

TeacherVision.com published a biography of the Judith St. George at this link.

Share

Marine Art Exhibition, “American Waters,” on View at LAA Through July 31

"A Seaport Moment" by James Wagner is one of the signature paintings of the 'American Waters' exhibition.

“A Seaport Moment” by James Wagner is one of the signature paintings of the ‘American Waters’ exhibition.

Lyme Art Association (LAA) presents its summer exhibition, American Waters, in the LAA’s sky-lit galleries from June 12 through July 31. The exhibition will feature work by the country’s premier maritime artists, who are members of the American Society of Marine Artists as invited guests, alongside exciting marine work by LAA artists.

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held Friday, June 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the LAA, 90 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome and refreshments will be served.

'Marshall Point' by Kent Winchell.

‘Marshall Point’ by Kent Winchell.

Russ Kramer, an internationally recognized marine painter, will jury the exhibition.  Kramer comments, “What better place for an exhibition of marine-inspired art than the Lyme Art Association?” continuing, “It is a true landmark in our region’s artistic history, whose proximity to the Lieutenant and Connecticut rivers and Long Island Sound has inspired artists for a century. These new works in the exhibition American Waters are by many of the finest practitioners of marine art working today. To think the same subjects continue to inspire us 100 years later is testament to this area’s enduring, irresistible allure.”

'Afternoon Light' by the late Yves Parent.

‘Afternoon Light’ by the late Yves Parent.

Concurrent with the American Waters exhibition, the LAA presents a large exhibition of Yves Parent maritime paintings. Many of these paintings are of coastal landmarks, recognizable to boaters who have spent time in the waters around the New England coast. This will be the final opportunity to view and purchase paintings from the estate of Yves Parent at the LAA.

Lyme Art Association Board President, Katherine Simmons, states, “American Waters continues an LAA tradition of exhibiting the very best of fine contemporary American marine painting. We are grateful to the members of the American Society of Marine Artists who are joining us as invited guests, and we would especially like to thank our premier media sponsor, The Day, and our presenting sponsor, Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law, along with juror Russ Kramer, for making this exhibition happen.”

The LAA was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association’s home is a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within a national historic district.

Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call (860) 434-7802.

Share

Old Lyme’s Woman’s Exchange Donates $3,000 to Local Charities

Ali Brinkman (President, Simply Sharing), Cathy Zall  (New London Homeless Hospitality Center), Mary Crist (Treasurer, Woman's Exchange), Dale Malcarne (President, Woman’s Exchange) and Laverne Alexander (Grant Chairwoman)

Woman’s Exchange grant givers and presenters gather for a photo, from left to right, Ali Brinkman (President, Simply Sharing), Cathy Zall (New London Homeless Hospitality Center), Mary Crist (Treasurer, Woman’s Exchange), Dale Malcarne (President, Woman’s Exchange) and Laverne Alexander (Grant Chairwoman)

Grants totaling $2,000 were presented by The Lyme Tree Woman’s Exchange of Old Lyme to two local non-profit organizations at the store in the Old Lyme Marketplace on Monday, June 15.  Organizations receiving the grants included the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, Inc. and the Simply Sharing of Essex.

The Woman’s Exchange also made a donation of $1,000 to the Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries to purchase food for distribution to those in need along the Connecticut shoreline.

The Women’s Exchange is located in the Old Lyme Marketplace and is a wonderful place to shop for unique gifts, jewelry and decorative items.  Many of the items are consigned to the shop for sale by crafters and all profits, after expenses, are donated to charity.

Share

“Celebrate Center!” Historians Visit Old Lyme Historical Society Exhibit

The entire committee in front of a Celebrate Center display that showcased original signage and furniture: kneeling (left to right): Anne Colangelo, Lizzy Duddy, and Lauren Presti. Standing, left to right:  Emily Nickerson,  John Coffey,  Gabe Katwaru,  Zoe Jensen, and Elise DeBernardo.

The entire committee in front of a Celebrate Center display that showcased original signage and furniture: kneeling (left to right): Anne Colangelo, Lizzy Duddy, and Lauren Presti. Standing, left to right: Emily Nickerson, John Coffey, Gabe Katwaru, Zoe Jensen, and Elise DeBernardo.

On Thursday, June 4, seven of the eight students who were the driving force behind the May 1 “Celebrate Center!”  ceremony and display visited their new neighbor, the Old Lyme Historical Society (OLHS), to take in their current exhibit, “A Glimpse of Early Schools in Lyme, Connecticut, 1650-1868.”  The invitation was extended by Kevin Cole, a member of the OLHS Board of Trustees, Region 18 Liaison; Center School alumnus; and a fifth-grade teacher there, recently retired.

Alison C. Mitchell and Kevin Cole address the Celebrate Center committee when they visited the Old Lyme Historical Society.

Alison C. Mitchell and Kevin Cole address the Celebrate Center committee when they visited the Old Lyme Historical Society.

Although these students did not have ‘Mr. Cole’ as a classroom teacher, he was a familiar, popular presence at the school. Exhibit Chair Alison C. Mitchell, along with Cole, greeted the children and, after time for refreshments provided by the Historical Society, guided them through the various displays.

The 'Celebrate Center' Committee stands in front of the school (left to right): Lauren Presti, Elise DeBernardo,  Lizzy Duddy, Emily Nickerson, Zoe Jensen, Gabe Katwaru, and John Coffey. Missing from photo: Anne Colangelo.

The ‘Celebrate Center’ Committee stands in front of the school (left to right): Lauren Presti, Elise DeBernardo, Lizzy Duddy, Emily Nickerson, Zoe Jensen, Gabe Katwaru, and John Coffey. Missing from photo: Anne Colangelo.

The students learned that during this historical period, local school districts certified their teachers to teach; a certificate is on display. Along with numerous photos, there are such artifacts as a schoolmaster’s watch; schoolbooks of the day, including a hornbook—students were surprised at the small size of some of these books; a slate pencil; toys; and a flag with 13 stars.

Fifth-grader Lizzy Duddy was intrigued by the books. “They were very interesting because of all the different spellings. I liked all the cool pictures and artifacts.” Staff Advisor Helen Traver Scott felt this was “a wonderful opportunity for the students to see what it was like before Center School was built. The students were interested and polite and asked intelligent questions.”

Back at the school following the tour, the students were met with a surprise …

A T-shirt presented to the students showing the mural inside the front lobby of Center School.

A T-shirt presented to the students showing the mural inside the front lobby of Center School.

Scott, an Old Lyme native herself and Center School alumna who spearheaded ‘Celebrate Center’ and coordinated the students’ efforts, presented each student with a small photo album containing pictures of the display boards the students made for Celebrate Center, a copy of the speech he or she made during the May 1 program, and a T-shirt printed with an image of the mural in the front lobby of Center School.

Student committee n front of display board, with Center School mural in background (left to right): John Coffey, Lizzy Duddy, Emily Nickerson, Anne Colangelo, Zoe Jensen, Elise DeBernardo, and Lauren Presti. (Missing from photo: Gabe Katwaru.)

Student committee members stand proudly in front of an event display board with the Center School mural in background. From left to right, John Coffey, Lizzy Duddy, Emily Nickerson, Anne Colangelo, Zoe Jensen, Elise DeBernardo, and Lauren Presti. (Missing from photo: Gabe Katwaru.)

This mural depicts local scenery, both current and historic, and was created by all the students several years ago immediately following the renovation in the pointillism style, with each student adding dots of color.

The student committee at the Old Lyme Historical Society (left to right, kneeling): Lizzy Duddy, Elise DeBernardo, and Lauren Presti. Standing, left to right: John Coffey, Zoe Jensen, Gabe Katwaru, and Emily Nickerson. Missing from photo: Anne Colangelo.

The student committee at the Old Lyme Historical Society (left to right, kneeling): Lizzy Duddy, Elise DeBernardo, and Lauren Presti. Standing, left to right: John Coffey, Zoe Jensen, Gabe Katwaru, and Emily Nickerson. Missing from photo: Anne Colangelo.

There were eight students who made all the displays for Celebrate Center. Anne Colangelo, unfortunately, was not able to tour the Historical Society. Those attending were John Coffey, Elise DeBernardo, Lizzy Duddy, Zoe Jensen, Gabe Katwaru, Emily Nickerson, and Lauren Presti.

Two of these students are “descendants” of other Center School alumni: Lizzy Duddy’s sister, Lexi Duddy; father, John Duddy; grandmother Patricia Bugbee; great uncle Don Bugbee; and great-grandfather Donald Bugbee as well as various aunts, uncles, and cousins all attended Center School.

Emily Nickerson’s grandmother Beverly Mathiason and several uncles attended the school.

Friday these fifth grade students will make history as the very last class to graduate from Center School. A clearly pleased Scott points out, “They will take all the friends they made and the history they learned with them when they move on to middle school.”

Share

Op-Ed: Old Lyme Conservation Commission Explains Its Disagreement With Lyme, Old Lyme Selectmen’s Rogers Lake Herbicide Proposal

The fundamental purpose of the Old Lyme Conservation Commission (OLCC) is to protect the natural resources of the Town of Old Lyme.  We believe that Rogers Lake is one of the most important natural resources we have and that it deserves the attention of not just those taxpayers who live around the lake, but the attention of the entire town.

The OLCC is the first to admit that Rogers Lake presents a host of problems, the greatest of which is invasives entering the lake.  We are convinced that there are other viable methods to be tried, before resorting to the ongoing application and expense of using questionable chemicals.

Clean water is a precious resource that should be preserved scrupulously.  Rogers Lake is the next best thing to have to a town reservoir.  Porous sand and gravel underlie much of Rogers Lake, so lake water supplies many of the shallow wells in the Rogers Lake area and in the Lieutenant River and Black Hall River watershed to the south.

The Position of the Old Lyme Conservation Commission:

The OLCC is against the current proposal to apply herbicides to Rogers Lake vegetation before other options are thoroughly explored.

The situation:

Currently, the use of herbicides to control growth in the lake is being promoted.  The Selectmen of the Towns of Lyme and Old Lyme favor this approach, as do many lakeside homeowners.  It may appear to be an expedient solution to the complaints of swimmers and boaters, who see the burgeoning growth of both natural as well as invasive plants in the water.

However, the OLCC believes that there are other viable solutions that should be explored.  Before any final decision is made, the townspeople of Old Lyme and Lyme should understand options, provide input and ask questions before being taxed for the ongoing and ever-rising expenses.

This will be the very first time that a pesticide is introduced to the lake.  Once the chemistry of the lake is changed, there will be no way to retreat from this plan.  It is long-term.

While some people dismiss the application of a pesticide as nothing more than what they apply regularly to their lawns,  much of these lawn chemicals quickly drain into the lake, and continue to support plant growth in the lake.

The history of this problem:

Over the last 20 years, the OLCC has applauded the Rogers Lake Authority (RLA) for their efforts to improve conditions in and around the lake. These efforts have included an aggressive program to reduce the number of water fowl that yearly account for a rather startling amount of raw sewage. The RLA has used minor drawdowns, raking, harvesting, even scuba divers in attempts to control weeds.  One of their most successful tactics has been the use of benthic mats which block the sunlight so that the invasive plants die out.  Each of the techniques did what they were advertised to do, but the weeds returned, and now we even have two new invasive weeds, as well as green algae.

So, after various efforts over 20 years at a cost of about $400,000, Rogers Lake is worse off than before, according to Rogers Lake Authority and George Knocklein of Northeast Aquatics.

Addressing the problem:

To face the new challenge, the Towns of Lyme and Old Lyme formed a committee in 2014.  A Massachusetts firm provided input, and, in the end, recommended using the pesticide Clipper (flumioxazin) as the most effective approach to killing the invasive weeds (what weeds?)

The problems with this approach are:

  • This chemical quickly disperses, forming two metabolites APF and THPA (by-products).
  • While Clipper is not supposed to be very toxic to humans and “moderately to highly” toxic to fish, there have been no tests for toxicity or bioaccumulation on the two metabolites as of 2012.
  • Rogers Lake is considered a trophy trout lake. The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) annually restocks the lake, which attracts fishermen and tournaments.  In addition, the DEEP salmon project on Lower Mill Pond raises salmon eggs.  The DEEP has recently constructed a fish ladder on Town Woods Road to introduce alewife fish.  It’s possible that yearly applications of Clipper may impact these programs.
  • New England Environmental, Inc. (NEE) admitted that they didn’t have a lot of experience with Clipper, and they readily admit that treatments with the herbicide will have to be repeated regularly for the foreseeable future.
  • New England Environmental, Inc. has not established a dollar cost for the first treatment.

In addition to the unresolved effects of chemicals, these questions remain:

  • To help curb additional growth in Rogers Lake, the Old Lyme Health Department has maintained an active program that requires residents to adhere to septic system pumpout and inspection. However, why doesn’t the Town of Lyme have any requirements like this?
  • Has NEE thoroughly explored the feasibility of a major drawdown of the lake? This would provide an opportunity to remove muck along the shoreline.  This would expose the sand and gravel bottom, which is a poor host to vegetation.
  • Even more important, has NEE identified the sources of the nutrients entering the lake each year? These nutrients nurture unlimited growth of vegetation.  An example of this is Uncas Lake, just one mile north, which is regarded as one of the cleanest lakes in Connecticut.  There is almost no weed growth, and very few houses.  Compare this to Rogers Lake’s growing beds of vegetation.
  • Five streams flood Rogers Lake with fresh nutrients, which contribute to this rich crop of weeds. Has this committee explored establishing silt ponds at each stream’s entrance, which will reduce the inflow of phosphorous from lawn and garden fertilizers in the larger watershed.
  • Building lots around the lake were divided when owners used small homes only during summers. Many septic systems near the lake may be substandard, and those in Lyme are not inspected or pumped out on a regular basis.
  • Additionally, many lake residents live year-round, putting additional strain on septic systems.
  • There’s an increase in waterfowl, and now they remain through the winder. These 40-50 Canada geese average three pounds of feces per day….more than a human!  Do the math and be shocked at this amount of raw sewage!
  • And, primarily, why don’t the two towns consider hiring a manager, one who would have a long-term personal investment in establishing good water quality in Rogers Lake, as well as arrange improved and continuing education for residents to be conscious stewards of the water resource?

Rogers Lake is important for several reasons:

  • It is the major source of drinking water for the Town of Old Lyme;
  • Its watershed extends for miles beyond Old Lyme into East Lyme and into Long Island Sound.
  • Its presence and availability provides added value to nearby homes. This also provides added tax revenue to both towns.

Conclusion:

While the current problem of vegetative growth is serious, the OLCC sees this as an opportunity to educate residents and raise awareness of the long-lasting effects of human convenience on the environment, for both the present moment and for the future.

The OLCC is prepared and willing to assist in carrying out solutions that will address these issues, as well as treat the current need to control vegetative growth.

Share

NL County Residents Receive Free Admission to Florence Griswold Museum Second Sundays During Summer

During Free Summer Second Sundays, visitors can enjoy the exhibition All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York as well as a variety of outdoor activities and hands-on projects.

During Free Summer Second Sundays, visitors can enjoy the exhibition All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York as well as a variety of outdoor activities and hands-on projects.

Thanks to a grant from the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut, all residents of New London County receive free admission to the Florence Griswold Museum on second Sundays this summer – June 14, July 12, Aug. 9, and Sept. 13.

The Museum’s riverfront landscape is situated on an 11-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme. In addition to the restored Florence Griswold House, where a generation of Impressionist artists lived, the Museum features an exhibition gallery, education and landscape centers, extensive gardens, and a restored artist’s studio.

Pictured from the 'All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York' exhibition, James Edward Buttersworth’s Yacht Race off Fort Wadsworth, ca. 1870 from the Museum of the City of New York.

Pictured from the ‘All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York’ exhibition, James Edward Buttersworth’s Yacht Race off Fort Wadsworth, ca. 1870 from the Museum of the City of New York.

Visitors to Summer Second Sundays will enjoy, All the Sea Knows: Marine Art from the Museum of the City of New York, an exhibition of that highlights the Museum of the City of New York’s renowned marine art collection. From folk art gems to Hudson River School panoramas to moody Tonalist contemplations of man and sea, these works capture the excitement of the age of sail and steam.

Visitors can also tour the historic Florence Griswold House, restored to its appearance as the boardinghouse for the Lyme Art Colony, stroll through Miss Florence’s historic gardens, and relax along the banks of the Lieutenant River. Can You Find Me cards in the gallery and a scavenger hunt in the historic house make the trip both fun and educational for families.

Visitors of any age can drop in at the Museum’s Education Center for a quick painting lesson before heading down to the river or out in the garden for an afternoon of plein-air painting. All materials included. The new outdoor Art Cart invites exploration of the grounds through interactive, hands-on projects.

“Free Summer Second Sundays is a great way for the Museum to make new friends in New London County,” notes David D.J. Rau, the Museum’s Director of Education and Outreach. He adds, “We are grateful for the support of The Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut.”

New London County residents can enjoy Free Summer Second Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. with proof of residency. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The Museum is located at 96 Lyme St., Old Lyme, exit 70 off I-95.

For additional information, contact the Museum at 860-434-5542 or visit www.FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org.

Share